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Partners in Action

Family Engagement

NCDB and NFADB have joined forces to raise awareness on the critical importance of providing individualized services to children and adults who are deaf-blind! As part of a yearlong action campaign, a series of webinars will concentrate on three specific aspects of individualized services: the role of interveners, improving access to information through technology and the impact individualized services can have on quality of life issues for the individual who is deaf-blind.

The first of these webinars, Looking to the Future of Deaf-Blind Services and the Role of the Intervener was just held on February 12th. If you missed it, you can view a recording at https://nationaldb.org/library/page/2372

Let’s make time for more conversation!

The NCDB/NFADB action campaign is all about raising awareness for the need for individualized services. To help accomplish this, we will be hosting an open forum discussion after each webinar. Please join the discussion! We want and need to hear your ideas!

1. What do you think is the best way to get the word out to parents and family members
on the role of an intervener?
2. For the parent or family that knows very little about interveners, what information would you recommend they receive first?
3. The NCDB/NFADB series of webinars is one way to reach a broad audience but what other approaches can be used?

Kathy McNulty

Posted Feb 20, 2014 by Kathy McNulty

23 190 views intervener parent
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Comments (23)

Gail & Peggy -- thanks for acting so quickly on getting the wikipedia page on Interveners up and running. That's so exciting!

Paddi Davies

Posted Mar 18, 2014 by Paddi Davies

Kathy, thanks for compiling the list of ideas. I have checked one item off of that list...Create an entry in Wikipedia on Interveners. It was published today at : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intervener . Creating and editing in Wikipedia is not as simple as one might guess and so the article had to go thru a vetting process as I was a first time contributor. Will work on the entry related to Deafblindness next. As part of moving thru other items on your list, I would love suggestions for putting some of this information on the for Families audience page that is part of the main navigation on the website. What information is important for families to see here? Imagine that you can create one thing that speaks to a family member landing on the page https://nationaldb.org/families. What would it be?

Gail Leslie

Posted Mar 18, 2014 by Gail Leslie

Thank you Clara for your wonderful message! I think it is great that NFADB will be working on a vision statement for the Partners in Action campaign.

So many great ides have been generated throughout this discussion that a Partners in Action Wiki has been created to make sure no idea is lost or forgotten! To make reading easier, ideas have been organized into several strands:
creating a vision statement for the Partners in Action Campaign
resources/materials on interveners
promotional “awareness” strategies
messaging tips

We hope that you will:
 visit the Partners in Action Wiki often;
 feel free to expand on ideas;
 share information on how an idea might be implemented.

By participating in this forum you can help to enrich the experience of others. The NCDB/NFADB action campaign is all about raising awareness for the need for individualized services. Let’s keep the dialogue going and the ideas flowing!

Kathy McNulty

Posted Mar 12, 2014 by Kathy McNulty

Gail, your message is wonderful and it reflects NFADB’s primary initiative which is to create awareness around Individualized Support Services providing all the necessary information and resources to the families to educate themselves about what they need to know to help their own children obtain the best support services.
The ideas shared in this page are really good and they will help in many different ways to disseminate the information about Interveners. If that information is shared by all of us with a clear and uniformed vision - that we all agree on - it will make it even more relevant. You are right and we do need to have a few heart catching sentences describing why all of us so strongly believe in the benefits an Intervener, SSP or Interpreter will provide to our children.
NFADB is blessed with board members who are excellent writers and creative thinkers who can work in the next few weeks on developing a message describing the Vision NCDB and NFADB share about individualized supports.
By the way, Paddi, yes, you were on a role, and I think including the word Intervener in Wikipedia is going to provide us with a larger internet audience who will have an easy access to the description of services. The more we talk about it, the more benefit for the families.

Clara Berg

Posted Mar 5, 2014 by Clara Berg

I love the idea of a video message that we could link to on our project Facebook pages or in emails to families that still use that form of communication.

Peggy Sinclair-Morris

Posted Mar 5, 2014 by Peggy Sinclair-Morris

There are some great ideas here. I love the idea of creating a Wikipedia entry for Interveners (we ought to spruce up the one on Deafblindness while we are at it). We have some great information with which to begin the page. I will volunteer to work on this and have solicited my co-worker Peggy Malloy. She is leading out on NCDB's Intervener Initiative. I was also wondering about some succinct wording around the joint NCDB/NFADB action campaign. Are there a few sentences that you are using to describe the vision? I know that the webinars, forum discussions, module creation, and parent training within the modules are all part of activities aimed at building awareness, but there is nothing like a few good sentences that we all could use to remind us of the overarching goal. I think we could use a section of the For Families audience page that is on the NCDB website to get out the message about the campaign, insert a video message and point to one or two resources. That would provide a link that states could use on Facebook or other methods of dissemination.

Gail Leslie

Posted Mar 3, 2014 by Gail Leslie

Wow, this is a wonderful discussion. I love all the ideas and am intrigued with a coordinated effort of creating an intervener section on Wikipedia while using other social media to spread the word and share resources. Paddi, you are so right, we need to streamline the message and make it easy for people who are new to get the information they need.

Edgenie Bellah

Posted Feb 28, 2014 by Edgenie Bellah

I think that an intervener section on the Deafblindness Wikipedia page has great potential! This would be a very powerful and effective way of raising awareness without too much effort and no cost. We have the expertise and knowledge within the DB Network to make it happen. Anyone interested in working on this?

Kathy McNulty

Posted Feb 27, 2014 by Kathy McNulty

Love Peggy's idea of getting an intervener page on the Deafblindness section of Wikipedia!! Maybe can share all the documents too via links.....

Lyn Ayer

Posted Feb 25, 2014 by Lyn Ayer

Just watched the social media clip on YouTube. Thanks for sharing it Paddi; it was very informative and rang true.

Peggy Sinclair-Morris

Posted Feb 25, 2014 by Peggy Sinclair-Morris

Another thought (I'm on a role today - smile). When you do a search for most anything, Wikipedia often comes up at the top of the search results. But, when you search for Intervener, it comes up with Intervention, which is a practice in law. Maybe someone needs to start an "Intervener" wikipedia entry. And definitely include it as part of the "Deafblindness" wikipedia entry. Actually, all types of individualized supports (intervener, interpreters and Support Service Providers) should be described on the Deafblindness wikipedia page.

Paddi Davies

Posted Feb 25, 2014 by Paddi Davies

This was from a post on another forum, but it seems appropriate here. If you have a few minutes, watch this 2013 video on the use of social media. It's entertaining....and informative. There are some fascinating figures shared via a YouTube video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXD-Uqx6_Wk. According to the video, 50% of the world's population is under 30. Those are the parents with young kids with deaf-blindness. And people in that age range consider email to be outdated.

Paddi Davies

Posted Feb 25, 2014 by Paddi Davies

I'm not a parent of a child with disabilities, so I'll just speak from my experience of seeking information on a topic I'm passionate about. I tend to pay most attention to articles that give me a short, clear summary of what is within the resource. And video or pictures accompanying it grab my interest and give me a visual to help understand the content. I think facebook is a powerful tool for getting information out in a "sound bite." The sound bite will draw me in to a more comprehensive resource.

But....not everyone is on facebook or twitter. We need a reliable, easy to access place for parents to access information. I think having it on NCDBs, NFADBs and state project websites will be very helpful. But, the key is to not overwhelm people with lots and lots of resources. If I go to a site and there are thirty resources in no order of importance or priority, I feel like curling up in a ball. I think giving parents a few really valuable resources is the way to go.

Paddi Davies

Posted Feb 25, 2014 by Paddi Davies

In Virginia we use Social Media to try and reach our families. We spend time looking through other groups Facebook pages to see what is going on with other states and interveners. We share information that is really pertinent to our families in addition to partnering with our state Parent Resource Center.

Peggy Sinclair-Morris

Posted Feb 24, 2014 by Peggy Sinclair-Morris

Really enjoying the discussion. I'm wondering if there is a way through a coordinated effort of web blasts within the Deaf-Blind Network that we could do a more effective job of getting the word out at the local levels. Appreciate your thoughts on this.

Kathy McNulty

Posted Feb 24, 2014 by Kathy McNulty

Oops, I accidentally hit my return key before spell-checking or completing my comments a minute ago. I think it is so important that the modules and information and links to resources about interveners is on the NCDB site and I think it will help if state projects also include these links on their websites and within other social media they use. I think this information also need to be passed along to districts and LEAs within our states especially in areas where we know several students with deaf-blindeness are served. One of the districts our state project has included in OHOA showed a lot of interest from the administration to get this information out to teachers and support staff in their districts. We then need to continue to discuss strategies to ensure districts understand the educational value of interveners and are sharing this information with families . Another way to disseminate this information and resources is through family support organizations and local family resource networks.

Julie Maier

Posted Feb 21, 2014 by Julie Maier

I think the suggested resources, especially the guides that can be easily passed on to interested to families to download, are fantastic ideas. I agree it can be very powerful for families to learn this information from other families who have a child with an intervener or from individuals who use interveners. I thik it will be important ofr state projects to identify which families in their states might be able to server as ambassadors to get the word out to other families and also to districts or other education agencies. I have a concern that soem families who need this information may not receive it because their child is being served in districts or LEAs weho also don't know much about intervenoers and so do not share this information with families. Fot families in smaller or rural districts/LEAs they may not come into contact with others who could shre this information.


Our state DB project has joined Idaho and Montana to host interested paraeducators to complete the OHOA modules.

Julie Maier

Posted Feb 21, 2014 by Julie Maier

Families do need to network and help get the word out about Interveners and understanding the role and to help others understand about the role of an Intervener. I think one of the most family friendly resources is the "A Family's Guide to Interveners" as it is written by families that have Interveners. This can be found and downloaded for free at www.intervener.org The guide addresses what is an Intervener and what is effective intervention for children and youth with deaf-blindness and the role the Intervener plays in providing this intervention. The guide also gives some great tips and key questions that families should ask during their child's IEP. This material helped me as I advocated for my son's need. Knowledge is power and we as parents need to help educate ourselves and others.
Another great opportunity of learning is the Open Hand Open Access Modules that can be viewed by parents and or family Members right here on the NCDB website. A great opportunity for parents only will be the pilot of Module #3 hosted by NCDB and NFADB. Information can be found about this on the NCDB website under events>online training https://nationaldb.org/events?category=3
I too would love to hear how other states are reaching parents and families to discuss information on the role of the Intervener. Do you use Facebook, have a listserv, mailings? Please share!

Patti McGowan

Posted Feb 21, 2014 by Patti McGowan

I really like the use of using video vignettes to help describe those hotbed issues that continue to surface in family circles; what is an intervener , does this type of service exist in my state and how does it differ from respite and support service provider efforts. I would like to see more intentional efforts to channel the voices of those students whose lives have been impacted by this service.

Mike Fagbemi

Posted Feb 21, 2014 by Mike Fagbemi

Thanks Barbara & Clara for starting the discussion! Hope we can get more people to join us.

Kathy McNulty

Posted Feb 21, 2014 by Kathy McNulty

Many states are providing workshops or webinars related to Individualized Support Services, I would suggest families who are interested in learning more about Interveners to get in touch with their Deaf-Blind State Project to find out which kind of training opportunities are available.

Clara Berg

Posted Feb 21, 2014 by Clara Berg

Jody Greenberg Wolfe started a Facebook page, Intervener Deaf-Blind Family Group.

Barbara Loughran

Posted Feb 21, 2014 by Barbara Loughran

Free download of the Booklet: A Family' Guide to Interveners for Children with Combined Vision and Hearing Loss, http://intervener.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/A-Familys-Guide-to-Interveners.pdf A nice introduction to the topic. Every parent dreams of finding the best way for their child to be communicate, be understood and learn.

Barbara Loughran

Posted Feb 21, 2014 by Barbara Loughran

NCDB : The Research Institute : Western Oregon University : 345 N. Monmouth Ave. : Monmouth, OR 97361
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