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Dr. Susan Bruce's Webinar- Assessment and Instruction for Students with Deafblindness- 12/14/16

Interveners and Qualified Personnel

Thank you for the fantastic presentation co-hosted by NCDB and the Division on Visual Impairment and Deafblindness (DVIDB) through the Council for Exceptional Children! We will post the recorded webinar here and you are welcome to ask questions or make comments here.

Amy Parker

Posted Dec 14, 2016 by Amy Parker

8 164 views
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Comments (8)

I hope that we can all share ideas about teaching literacy skills to students who are prelinguistic. Common literacy lessons in deafblindness include: story boxes, home-school journals, experience stories, home-school journals and schedules. When teaching about schedule systems, I always emphasize that each trip to the schedule/anticipation shelf is an opportunity for a meaningful conversation and that each of these events is a lesson. Schedules are not a transition tool alone. Choice-making lessons can also be a literacy lesson for our students. However, the choice-making must be meaningful, authentic. So, what does that require? It requires experiential background to comprehend the options offered, accessibility (such as appropriate enlargement of pictures of the options), comprehension of the representations of options (such as objects, pictures, or line drawings), a clear indicating response, appropriate array size with appropriate spacing and time provided. A choice is only a choice if the student knows what he/she is being offered and has a real preference of one option over the other(s). We should only say that a student is making choices if these conditions are present and we are certain that the selections the student makes are with meaning. If this is not present or the skill is emerging, we can say that the student "participates in a choice-making routine." I find these distinctions important and something we can clarify for parents. Sorry for the soapbox-it's one of my things...my students will tell you....Susan Bruce

Susan Bruce

Posted Dec 16, 2016 by Susan Bruce

Great information....thanks for always recording! Sherri Nelson

SHERRI NELSON

Posted Dec 15, 2016 by SHERRI NELSON

Thank All of You that contribute as it sure helps me alot!

Twinkle Morgan

Posted Dec 14, 2016 by Twinkle Morgan

Twinkle has shared a thought provoking topic that we may consider in assessing students who are deafblind and when to identify intellectual disabilities. My own thoughts on this have to do with opportunities, that Susan alluded to in her magnificent webinar. I think that assessing whether the individual has had opportunities to have access to information, communication, participation, and supports has to be a part of determining true intellectual disabilities. What are some thoughts from others on this topic? Some resources on this important topic? Thanks for asking the BIG questions, Twinkle!

Amy Parker

Posted Dec 14, 2016 by Amy Parker

Great Information! Thank you! Happy Holidays :)

Noelia Perez

Posted Dec 14, 2016 by Noelia Perez

To find the webinar recording link, captioning files, and the documents that were presented in this webinar please click the link below...
https://nationaldb.org/library/page/2639

What a fantastic presentation from Susan!

Shelby Morgan

Posted Dec 14, 2016 by Shelby Morgan

So thoughts about identifying a child that is deafblind and considering an additional disability of ID.

Twinkle Morgan

Posted Dec 14, 2016 by Twinkle Morgan

Just checking in

Twinkle Morgan

Posted Dec 14, 2016 by Twinkle Morgan

NCDB : The Research Institute : Western Oregon University : 345 N. Monmouth Ave. : Monmouth, OR 97361
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