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Calendar Systems Bibliography

by DB-LINK on Feb 1, 2013
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This is a partial list of materials on this topic available from the NCDB Catalog Database.  If you have additional questions, please contact us via email: info@nationaldb.org

Updated 2/2013

2004-0001

Anticipation and Calendar Systems This is an informally produced video showing different students using anticipation and calendar systems. There are 6 different examples. Many of the clips show how the calendar box idea has been modified to fit the needs of each student. Submitted to DB-LINK in November of 2003 by Gretel Sampson at the Utah School for the Deaf and the Blind (801-725-9342; gretels@usdb.org).

2008-0035

Avoiding Common Errors in the Use of Calendar Schedules as a Teaching/Learning Strategy With Persons Who Are Deafblind --Afutu, Nina Akuorkor. DBI REVIEW, #39, January-June 2007, pp. 14-16. (2007) The author, from the Demonstration School for the Deaf (Deafblind Centre) Mampong, Akwapim, Ghana, reports the findings from her study of the use of calendar systems and offers some advice.

2004-0035

Building Communication into Daily Routines: Communication Skills and Strategies for Individuals Working with Young Children Who Have Sensory Impairments --Newman, Todd (ed.) --SKI*HI. Logan, UT: HOPE Inc. What Do I Do Now? - Unit 6. (1997) This video is the sixth in a series of 24 that provides inservice training for staff in preschool and elementary school settings on the communication needs of children with sensory impairments. The purpose of the program is to provide basic instruction for paraeducators that focuses on the unique communication needs of these children. This unit discusses how repetition and consistent routines help to develop communication skills, and give children security. Provides guidelines for developing routines: 1) determine the child's preferred expressive and receptive communication system, 2) use that system to communicate about the events, objects, and people in his/her day, 3) have consistent routines, 4) provide opportunities within the routines for the child to initiate communication, 5) structure the day's events into a calendar system, 6) be patient while the child learns the routine, and 7) provide motivating activities for the child to encourage communication development. Includes a printed packet which contains the summary of the main points of the video, discussion topics, space for notetaking, and exercises for classroom application. Also includes an evaluation form for the paraeducator to use in coordinating with the supervising teacher before and after implementing training ideas, and a laminated card to be taken into the classroom for a quick reminders of the unit. Available from HOPE, Inc., 55 East 100 North, Suite 203, Logan, UT 84321; PH/FAX: (435) 752-9533. Publisher's web site: http://www.hopepubl.com/

2008-0004

Calendar Box Examples This DVD contains copies of two informally-produced videos (DB-LINK records 2004-0002 & 2004-0001) of students using calendar boxes. The first is of students at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. It was submitted to DB-LINK by Craig Axelrod at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired in October 2003. The video is not narrated but Craig also sent a page listing the sequence of examples included in the video and a copy of the outline he uses when using the video for training activities. Handouts that go with this video are clipping COM-04-001. The second is from the Utah School for the Deaf and the Blind (USDB) showing different students using anticipation and calendar systems. There are 6 different examples. Many of the clips show how the calendar box idea has been modified to fit the needs of each student. It was submitted to DB-LINK in November of 2003 by Gretel Sampson at USDB.

1996-0577

Calendar Box Selections (1996) This is a collection of pieces describing the creation and uses of calendar boxes.

2004-0041

Calendar Systems: Communication Skills and Strategies for Individuals Working with Young Children Who Have Sensory Impairments --Newman, Todd (ed.) --SKI*HI. Logan, UT: HOPE Inc. What Do I Do Now? - Unit 12. (1997) This video is the 12th in a series of 24 that provides inservice training for staff in preschool and elementary school settings on the communication needs of children with sensory impairments. The purpose of the program is to provide basic instruction for paraeducators that focuses on the unique communication needs of these children. This unit describes what calendar systems are and how they help a child with sensory impairments know what comes next in their day and what is happening around them. Provides some guidelines for using a calendar system, and how to create one. Describes information on how to choose which symbols for use in the system. Provides step-by-step information on how to assist a child in transitioning from an object calendar to a picture calendar. Includes a printed packet which contains the summary of the main points of the video, discussion topics, space for notetaking, and exercises for classroom application. Also includes an evaluation form for the paraeducator to use in coordinating with the supervising teacher before and after implementing training ideas, and a laminated card to be taken into the classroom for a quick reminders of the unit. Available from HOPE, Inc., 55 East 100 North, Suite 203, Logan, UT 84321; PH/FAX: (435) 752-9533. Publisher's web site: http://www.hopepubl.com/

2004-0142

Calendar Systems: An Important Strategy to Expand Communication, Teach Concepts, and Foster Emotional Well-Being --Schiller, James, MSW, LCSW. CONNECTIONS BEYOND SIGHT AND SOUND REACHING OUT, vol. 1, #4, Spring 2003, pp. 3-4. (2003) This article describes the importance of calendar systems for students who are deafblind. Included are the top six reasons to use a calendar system compiled from a larger list from Robbie Blaha, an expert on calendar systems. The aspect of communication is the focus of the remaining discussion.

2002-0069

Calendars: For Students With Multiple Impairments Including Deafblindness --Blaha, Robbie. Austin: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. (2001) This guide was developed for staff and families of students with multiple impairments including deafblindness and other disabilities. It communicates the benefits of the calendar systems, provides information on calendar programming for students, and provides information on the continuum of calendars for staff and families to help students expand their skills. Includes tips and directions for anticipation, daily, and expanded calendars, checklists and evaluations. Also available in Spanish. Cost: $30.00. Available from the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Business Office, 1100 West 45th Street, Austin, Texas 78756-3494. Phone: (512) 206-9427 or (512) 206-9215. Publisher's web site: http://www.tsbvi.edu/curriculum-a-publications/1024-calendars-for-students-with-multiple-impairments-including-deafblindness

1997-0347

Calendars for Deafblind Students: More Than A Daily Schedule --Pyle, Phyllis. UPDATE, Washington State Services for Children with Deaf-Blindness, Vol. 17, No. 3, Summer 1997, p. 3. (1997) Author is a parent from Washington state who attended the Hilton/Perkins National Conference on Deafblindness. She offers a review and her own insight related to a presentation about daily calendars given by Robbie Blaha, an educational consultant with the Texas Deaf-Blind Outreach Project. Offers a list describing what to do before building a calendar system for a particular child and a list of the potential benefits.

2003-0374

Christian's Excellent Day --Bielert, Ann; Knapp, Melanie. Austin, TX: Texas Deafblind Project. 2003 Texas Symposium on Deafblindness. (2003) Handout for a presentation. Subject student, Christian is a teenager who is deafblind and has additional disabilities. Includes photos, daily schedule (school and home), listing of about 75 calendar symbols, listing of instructional modifications and IEP objectives.

1994-0641

Construction and Use of Tangible Symbols --Rowland, Charity; Schweigert, Philip. Tucson, AZ: Communication Skill Builders. Tangible Symbol Systems. (1990) This chapter demonstrates the construction and use of tangible symbols, including calendar boxes. The program is for teachers, speech-language pathologists, other support staff, and parents who work with individuals who have severe multiple sensory disabilities. Based on Jan van Dijk's work in the Netherlands with children who are deaf-blind, these techniques are also suitable for individuals of all ages who have cognitive and/or other severe communication deficits due to other disabilities. List of other pertinent materials and ordering information included at the end.

2008-0512

Developing Prelanguage Communication in the Severely Handicapped: An Interpretation of the van Dijk Method --Stillman, Robert D.; Battle, Christy W. SEMINARS IN SPEECH & LANGUAGE, vol. 5, #3, August 1984, 159-170. (1984) This article provides an overview of the van Dijk approach to prelanguage communication development. It includes a discussion of the theoretical background to van Dijk's approach, including its reliance on work by Werner and Kaplan. Specific methods of the approach addressed include resonance activities, co-active activities (including the anticipation shelf), imitation activities (including calendar activities), and gestures.

2002-0277

Handouts 1-6 --Jan van Dijk. San Diego, C: Handouts from the California Coming Together 2002 Conference on Deaf-Blindness, May 16-18, 2002, San Diego, CA. (2002) This document contains descriptions of 6 handouts from the California Deaf-Blind Conference in 2002. Issues covered include establishing a secure bond with your child, helping the brain to grow, providing appropriate input, increasing memory, establishing routines, and using the calendar to converse with your child. Also provides information on appropriate methods of communication, and creating a positive atmosphere.

2009-0247

IEP Quality Indicators for Students with Deafblindness --Texas Deafblind Outreach. Austin, TX: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. (2009) This document is designed to help educational teams develop appropriate individualized education programs (IEPs) for students with deafblindness. It contains ten content areas, a short explanation of why each area is significant for students who are deafblind, and indicator statements. The presence of indicators demonstrate a well-designed IEP in areas related specifically to the needs of children with deafblindness. Indicators not present may indicate a training need for the team. The content areas included are etiology, access to information, social issues, communication, calendar system, behavior, orientation and mobility, related and supplemental services, transition planning, and a teaming process plan. This is a revised edition of a document originally published in 2009. This updated version includes teaming process plan indicators and new indicators highlighting considerations for an intervener and a teacher of the deafblind. Available on the web:http://www.tsbvi.edu/attachments/1800_IEP_Indicators.pdf

2000-0582

Principles and Strategies of Van Dijk – Volume 1 --MacFarland, Stephanie, Ph.D. The Blumberg Center at Indiana State University. Important Topics in Deafblind Education. (1997) This video presents the principles of the Van Dijk theory of educational programming for deafblind students. It describes the main principles including the distancing principle, developing self-concept, and concept development strategies of the theory. Resonance phenomenon (to develop turn taking), co-active movement sequence, attachment and rapport building, calendar boxes, and discrimination strategies are discussed as well. Order information can be obtained from the Blumberg Center, School of Education, Room 502, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809, PH: 800-622-3035.

2000-0583

Principles and Strategies of Van Dijk – Volume 2 --MacFarland, Stephanie, Ph.D. The Blumberg Center at Indiana State University. Important Topics in Deafblind Education. (1997) This video is part two of a series of three videotapes describing the Van Dijk theory of educational programming for deafblind students. It describes the concept of closure and the use of calendar boxes as a tactile schedule for the child. Slides are presented which portray the various strategies in effect. Representational reference, parallel and deferred imitation, categorization, and discrimination strategies are discussed as well. Order information can be obtained from the Blumberg Center, School of Education, Room 502, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809, PH: 800-622-3035.

2000-0584

Principles and Strategies of Van Dijk – Volume 3 --MacFarland, Stephanie, Ph.D. The Blumberg Center at Indiana State University. Important Topics in Deafblind Education. (1997) This video is the last in a three video series describing the concepts and principles of the Van Dijk theory of educational programming for deafblind students. A detailed description and example of calendar boxes is provided with explanation of how an individuals’ needs are met. Anticipatory activities are stressed when creating and implementing calendar box routines. Symbolic communication strategies are discussed with examples provided. Order information can be obtained from the Blumberg Center, School of Education, Room 502, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809, PH: 800-622-3035.

1994-0422

Sequence Box (Sometimes called a calendar box) --Trenbeth, Nancy. 1994. This two page article on communication describes the use and development of a sequence box (calendar box). It can help a blind or deaf-blind student learn to anticipate events and mentally sequence the day's activities. It helps the students understand such concepts as "work", "finished", "next", "more work" and moving sequentially, left to right. Dr. Jan van Dijk developed the strategy.

2009-0204

USING A SCHEDULE WITH YOUR CHILD/Family Connect. --American Foundation for the Blind: 2009, 3.

This article is about how a child with visual impairment and multiple disabilities, using a calendar or schedule will allow her to understand what she is going to do next, then after that, and then after that. This in turn will help her better understand the structure of the day overall and give her a sense of predictability in her life. This document is available on the web at: http://www.familyconnect.org/parentsite.asp?SectionID=79&TopicID=368&DocumentID=4059

1996-0298

What's a Calendar Box? --Schachter, Pam. FUTURE REFLECTIONS, vol. 15, #3, Summer 1996, pp. 47-49. (1996) Object communication and calendar boxes can be powerful communication tools for a child with deaf-blindness. They may also be a new and confusing method of communication for a teacher, parent, or therapist. This article provides a step-by-step description of how to make and use the calendar boxes that are so much a part of van Dijk's educational process. Article also appeared in the California Deaf-Blind Services publication, reSOURCES, Winter 1996.

1996-0681

Why Students with Deaf-Blindness Should Have a Calendar... --Bielert, Ann; Blaha, Robbie. Proceedings of the Fifth Canadian Conference on Deafblindness, Living & Learning: A Lifelong Adventure, Vancouver, B.C., May 8 - 11th, 1996. (1996) This article is a brief presentation of key reasons why students with deaf-blindness benefit from a calendar. It encompasses: developing communication skills, teaching time concepts, teaching time vocabulary, teaching time pieces, imparting emotional support and enhancing their ability to learn new information.  


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