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Sensory Integration Bibliography

by DB-LINK on May 1, 2013
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This is a partial list of materials on this topic available from the NCDB Catalog Database.  If you have additional questions, please contact us via email: info@nationaldb.org

2008-0556

Answers to Questions Teachers Ask about Sensory Integration (Including Sensory Processing Disorder): Forms, Checklists, and Practical Tools for Teachers and Parents --Koomar, Jane; Kranowitz, Carol; Szklut, Stacey; Balzer-Martin, Lynn; Haber, Elizabeth; Sava, Deanna Iris. Arlington, TX: Future Horizons, Inc. (2007) This short manual contains a series of brief information sheets and checklists on the following topics: sensory integration; occupational therapy; comparison of sensory integration and sensory processing disorder; classroom accommodations; forms to evaluate sensory integration issues for children of various ages (infants and toddlers, preschool, school-age, adult/adolescent); and characteristics of tactile, vestibular, proprioceptive, visual, and auditory dysfunction.

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2010-0140

Assessment of Communication --Crook, Carol; Miles, Barbara; Riggio, Marianne. Watertown, MA: Perkins School for the Blind. Remarkable Conversations: A guide to Developing Meaningful Communication With Children and Young Adults Who Are Deafblind. Barbara Miles and Marianne Riggio (Eds.) (1999) This book chapter includes information about methods of assessment, what is assessed, an extensive example illustrating the assessment of one child, activities to assess skills and competencies (e.g., locating toys, matching, responses to variations in light), and differences in the assessment of infants and toddlers. The section on methods of assessment covers reviewing records, parent interviews, conducting assessments in a child's home, arena assessments (one team member interacts with a child, while the rest of the team observes and assesses the child), and classroom assessments. The section on what is assessed includes available avenues for communication input and output (vision, touch, taste, smell, hearing, vocalization, motor skills, perception of sensory information, sensory integration); present communication skills; the communication environment; communication partners; and the ability to learn new skills.

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1995-0109

Blind Children's Fund Presents Lilli Nielsen: Joey, Parts 1 and 2; Erin, Parts 1 and 2 --Blind Children's Fund. Boston: (1991) These four videotapes continue to cover a session Nielsen did in Boston demonstrating The Little Room and other devices which she uses. Two more children are featured in demonstrations on these tapes. The demonstrations are followed by discussions of how Nielsen uses the devices and questions from the audience. Autism is addressed in the tapes about Erin. As in the previous three tapes tactile and auditory stimulation are utilized to increase sensory integration.

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2005-0143

CHARGE syndrome "behaviors": challenges or adaptations? --Brown D. American Journal of Medical Genetics, Vol 133A, Issue 3, March 15, 2005, 268-272. (2005) Sometimes behaviors reported as challenging are more often adaptive responses to severe levels of multi-sensory impairment. A therapy/educational response may be more productive. Multi sensory is more than deaf-blind. Issues related to balance, hearing, vision, and cranial nerve anomalies are discussed. These are followed by comments about sensory integration (SI) and communication. Finally there are examples of behaviors that were moved into “non-challenging” category by taking a multi-sensory perspective toward them. Available on the web: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/109873240/HTMLSTART.

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1997-0008

Combining Neuro-Developmental Treatment and Sensory Integration Principles: An Approach to Pediatric Therapy --Blanche, Erna I.; Botticelli, Tina M.; Hallway, Mary K. San Antonio, TX: Therapy Skill Builders. (1995) This manual, geared for the practitioner, shows how to utilize a combined approach of Neuro-Developmental Treatment, NDT, and Sensory Integration therapy, SI, to best meet a child's special needs in professional practice. The two therapies are described in detail. The manual includes assessment guidelines to help practitioners determine when a combined approach is most useful. Also included are reproducible checklists for evaluating a client's sensory and movement disorders. Case studies are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of using a combined approach to remediation. Chapters describe treatment of children with specific disorders, such as: sensory processing dysfunction, autism, cerebral palsy, fragile X syndrome, and Down syndrome. Activities addressing specific problem areas and sensory and motor focus with suggested modifications are offered. The book is available from Therapy Skill Builders, 555 Academic Court, San Antonio, TX 78204-2498, (800) 228-0752.

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2004-0150

Educational and Behavioral Implications of Missing Balance Sense in CHARGE Syndrome --Brown, David. California Deaf-Blind Services. RESOURCES, vol. 10, #15, Spring 2003, pp. 1-5. (2003) This article addresses the pervasive missing sense of balance among people with CHARGE syndrome. It provides information on the possible causes of this, as well as related issues such as low muscle tone, equilibrium problems, and the links between balance and hearing/vision. Also included is a description of sensory integration dysfunction and suggestions for parents and educators. Available on the web: http://www.sfsu.edu/~cadbs/Spring03.pdf.

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1994-0922

Feldenkrais Method of Exploration of the Corporal Behaviour of the Deaf-Blind Children --Robin, Samia. Proceedings of the III European Conference of the International Association for the Education of Deafblind People, Potsdam, Germany, July 31- August 5, 1993. (1993) Robin discusses the need of deaf-blind children for sensory integration. She discusses the need for ease of movement that can be gained only by encouraging children to use the other senses they still have to orient themselves and explore their environments. Children who are comfortable with the sensations they perceive can learn easier because they have developed a way to communicate with their surroundings.

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1997-0399

Gross Motor Development: Sensory Integration --Pogrund, Rona (Ed.); Fazzi, Diane L. (Ed.); Lampert, Jessica S. (Ed.) New York, NY: American Foundation for the Blind, AFB. Early Focus: Working with Young Blind and Visually Impaired Children and Their Families, pp.88-94. (1994) The sensory-integration approach for working with young children who are visually impaired is based on the concept that the gathering and processing of sensory information are the foundation of one's ability to deal effectively with the environment. It involves all the senses, especially the tactile, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems, which are important in the development of body and environmental awareness and which are described here. The effect of sensory information on movement and implications for the orientation and mobility (O&M) specialist working with children who are visually impaired is discussed. The usual sequence of gross motor development for children who are sighted and for children who are visually impaired are discussed. Strategies for the promotion of motor development in young children who are visually impaired are suggested.

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1999-0465

An Introduction to Sensory Integration --Arkwright, Nan MOT,OTR. TX: Therapy Skill Builders. (1998) This booklet offers a general overview of sensory integration and therapeutic interventions in an easy to read manner. The areas covered are: Introduction, The Central Nervous System and How It works, Occupational Therapy: What it Can Do for Your Child, followed by References and Suggested Reading. Therapy Skill Builders, a division of Psychological Corporation is the distributor. They can be reached at 1-800-228-0752, 555 Academic Court, San Antonio, Texas, 78204-2498

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1995-0763

Learning Object Concept and Permanence in Blind Infants --Nielsen, Lilli. VIP NEWSLETTER, vol. 11, no. 2, June 1995, 1-5. (1995) The paper does not deal with how to assess whether or not a blind child has achieved object concept or object permanence. Rather the author seeks to establish the nature of object concept or object permanence in the world inhabited by the blind child. Sensory integration is seen as a major factor in the child's development of sense of self in connection to objects in the environment.

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2000-0423

Look At Me: A Resource Manual for the Development of Residual Vision in Multiply Impaired Children --Smith, Audrey J.; Shane Cote, Karen. PA: (1982) This book covers the areas of special considerations when assessing vision of a child with multiple disabilities, basic anatomy of the eye, basic optical principles of the eye, common disorders and diseases of the eye, sensory integration, and a thorough description of a functional vision evaluation.

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2009-0281

Meeting the Needs of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students with Additional Disabilities Through Professional Teacher Development --Bruce, Susan; DiNatale, Patrice; Ford, Jeremiah. AMERICAN ANNALS OF THE DEAF, vol. 153, #4, pp. 368-375. (2008) This article describes a professional development effort to prepare in-service educators of the deaf to work with students with additional disabilities, including deaf-blindness. Over a 3-year period, teachers selected the following in-service topics: etiologies, vision conditions, behavior, transition, sensory integration, seizures, alternate assessment, and instructional strategies. In-class consultation was requested for support in the areas of formal assessment instruments, behavior, and student performance. Elements of effective professional development programs, such as honoring teachers’ choices about topics and participation, responding to teachers’ immediate classroom concerns, and providing in-class follow-up support, facilitated the success of this effort.

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1993-2257

Movement is Fun: A Preschool Movement Program --Young, Susan B.; Keplinger, Liz. Torrance, CA: Sensory Integration International. (1988) A movement program for preschoolers 3-5 years of age designed for three basic applications: to enhance normal motor and cognitive skills; to aid in the identification of children who may have developmental lags; to allow the development of group activities which incorporate sensory integration goals.

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2009-0078

Occupational Therapy and Sensory Integration for Visual Impairments --Ricketts, Lisa. TX SENSEABILITIES, FAll 2008, vol. 2, #4, pp.16-24. (2008) This article discusses the impact of visual impairment on sensory integration, and how sensory integration disorder manifests in students with blindness and visual impairments. Treatment approaches and educational interventions are also described. Available on the web: http://www.tsbvi.edu/resources/3159-occupational-therapy-and-sensory-integration-for-visual-impairment.

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1999-0153

Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Integration Dysfunction --Kranowitz, Carol Stock. New York, NY: Skylight Press. (1998) Recommended by parents of children with CHARGE Association, this book offers comprehensive, easily understood information on sensory integration dysfunction. It provides an overview of sensory integration dysfunction, identifying symptoms, characteristics and associated problems. Normal neurological development is discussed; how the tactile, vestibular, and proprioceptive senses work, how they influence everyday life, and what happens when they're inefficient. Includes criteria and guidance for getting a diagnosis and treatment, and suggestions for families and teachers to improve skills. The appendix contains an explanation of the role the central nervous system plays in sensory integration, and lists for resources and further readings. The book may be ordered by calling (800) 788-6262, or by visiting the publisher's website. Publisher's web site: http://www.penguinputnam.com.

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1993-2208

A Parent's Guide to Understanding Sensory Integration --Sensory Integration International, Inc. Torrance, CA: Sensory Integration International. (1991) This booklet was developed as a brief guide for parents, teachers, and occupational and physical therapists who work with children who have sensory interactive dysfunction. Sensory integration is defined, signs of sensory integrative dysfunction detailed, methods of evaluation discussed, and a glossary of sensory integration terms provided. Therapies, outcomes, and what parents can do to promote sensory integration in their children are suggested.

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2009-0224

Promoting Social Interaction For Individuals With Communicative Impairments: Making Contact --Zeedyk, M. Suzanne. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers London. (2008)This book presents successful approaches to nurturing communicative abilities in people who have some type of communicative impairment. It covers both the theory and practical implementation of a number of different approaches including intensive interaction, co-creative communication, sensory integration, and music therapy, for individuals with a wide variety of conditions including autism, profound learning disabilities, deaf-blindness, severe early neglect, and dementia. It includes a chapter by Paul Hart (Sense Scotland) that describes how it is possible for individuals with congenital deaf-blindness to develop language and the characteristics of ideal communication exchanges between people who are deaf-blind and their communication partners.

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1997-0049

School Hardening: Sensory Integration Strategies for Class and Home --Tupper, Lynne Courtney, M.P.H., OTR; Klosterman Miesner, Kathryn E., OTR. San Antonio, TX: Therapy Skill Builders. (1995) This book discusses the role of occupational therapy for school-aged children with learning disabilities. School hardening, a process whereby children improve their ability to learn, play, and socialize in a school environment, is described. The authors discuss sensory systems that affect a child's learning potential, the role of motor planning (praxis) in a child's performance and behavior, standardized evaluations and clinical observations for school-based and private therapists, treatment activities for classroom, home, and therapy room, and inter-professional consultation. In-depth studies of clinical cases are exemplified.

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1995-0864

Sensory Integration: Foundation for Development --Southpaw Enterprises, Inc. Dayton: Southpaw Enterprises, Inc. (1990)This little booklet defines occupational therapy and sensory integration. It then goes on to explain how sensory information is used by the brain to develop perceptual skills.

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1996-0563

Sensory Integration --Hatch-Rasmussen, Cindy. Internet. (1996) The author defines sensory integration and sensory integrative dysfunction. Tactile defensiveness is discussed, and the vestibular system and the proprioceptive system are explained. Evaluation and treatment of dysfunction in these areas is the job of occupational and physical therapists.

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2001-0289

Sensory Integration: An Educational View --Herron, Edna Ph.D. --Project ACCESS, Southwest Missouri State University. MO: FACT SHEET #8, April 1993, 5 pp. (1993)This is a brief overview of the sensory integration theory and some of the ways sensory integrative dysfunction may manifests itself in the classroom. Project ACCESS is located at Southwest Missouri State University, 901 South National Avenue, Springfield, Missouri 65804, Tel: 417-836-6755.

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2003-0506

Sensory Integration --Gloyn, Ann. Canadian Deafblind and Rubella Association. (September 4, 2003) This is an article on sensory integration which came from a STAR workshop. It defines sensory integration and discusses problems when integration is dysfunctional, providing examples of such problems. The article provides examples of signs and symptoms, therapy and remediation for, and specific strategies to enhance sensory integration.

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2001-0039

Sensory Integration and Its Effects on Young Children --Ramirez, Judy. (1998)This paper provides an overview of the literature on sensory integration in young children. First, it explains the importance of sensory integration in child development and normal functioning. It also notes signs of a sensory integration dysfunction (such as hyper-or hypo-sensitivity to touch, poor coordination, and poor behavioral control). Normal sensory development in infants is briefly reviewed. Effects of specific sensory impairments including the visual, tactile, and vestibular sense are noted.

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1994-0736

Sensory Integration and Learning Disorders --Ayres, A. Jean. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services. (1973) This book presents a neurobehavioral theory that is meant as a guide to action. The action intended is sensory integrative therapy to assist children with learning deficits. Selections and interpretations of basic brain research have been made with the intention of relating the data to observations of behavior of children with sensory integrative deficits. It is the deviations in maturation of the child's brain today and what to do about them that are the focus of this book. The therapy follows a progression similar to the theorized development of the modern human brain. Therefore, enhancing maturation at the lower, less complex levels of environmental-reponse function (gross motor patterns) enables a child to become more competent at the higher, more complex levels. The topics covered include brain and central nervous system functioning, the integrative process, tactile defensiveness, auditory-language disorders, form and space perception, developmental apraxia, and the art of therapy.

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2008-0023

Sensory Integration and Self-Regulation in Infants and Toddlers: Helping Very Young Children Interact With Their Environment --Williamson, G. Gordon; Anzalone, Marie E. Washington, DC: Zero to Three. (2001) This book is written for a multidisciplinary audience of practitioners who support the development of infants and young children in a variety of settings. Knowledge is synthesized to help readers understand the sensory development of infants and young children, learn about assessment and intervention approaches to promote self-regulation and adaptive behavior, and become aware of emerging research issues in this field. Includes chapters on sensory systems (tactile, vestibular, proprioceptive), sensory-based behavior in infants and young children, sensory integration (includes a chapter on praxis and dyspraxia), screening and assessment, play in the context of sensory-based intervention, and strategies to enhance self-initiation and adaptive behavior. Publisher's web site: www.zerotothree.org.

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1994-0763

Sensory Integration and the Child --Ayres, A. Jean. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services. (1994)This book is written for parents and aims to help them recognize sensory integrative problems in their children, understand what is going on, and respond with the best methods for their development.

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2003-0317

Sensory Integration Dysfunction in Deafblind Children --Deuce, Gail. DBI REVIEW, #30, July-December 2002, pp. 8-10. (2002) In this article, sensory integration, or the organization of information received from our different sensory modalities, is explored. The author, a teacher of deaf and deafblind children describes the idea behind sensory integration and how it is used to interact effectively within the world around us. She presents several case studies to illustrate the support that children with deafness or deafblindness may need in developing sensory integration.

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1996-0540

Sensory Integration: How Effective Is It? --LRP Publications. EARLY CHILDHOOD REPORT, Bonus Report, July 1996, pp. 1-4. (1996) This report documents how various school districts include sensory integration in their programs. Included are several court cases.

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2009-0191

Sensory Integration Perspective and What it Offers Us in the Field of Deafblindness --Brown, David. DBI REVIEW, July-December 2008, pp.22-26. (2008) David Brown explains about sensory intregration how it refers to three closely related but different things -a neurological process, a theory developed by Jane Ayers and a treatment approach known as Sensory Integration Therapy. He describes in detail the key principles of Sensory Integration Theory and its impact on deafblindness.

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2010-0076

Sensory Integration Perspective and What it Offers Us in the Field of Deafblindness : Part II --Brown, David. DBI REVIEW, Number 43, January-June 2009 pp.4-9. (2009) David Brown from California Deaf-Blind Services concludes his article on sensory integration. Within this article he describes adapting the therapy approach to allow for deafblindness. He provides examples of the most commonly encountered indicators of sensory integrative dysfuntion. The article also includes anecdotes of children with CHARGE syndrome and behaviors that were considered to be "challenging" by a family or school that were solved or avoided, or moved to the non-challenging category, by taking a multi-sensory view. The article also covers sensory modulation, varied sensory inputs, and levels of arousal.

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2003-0474

Sensory Integration Road Rules for Interveners --Birkenshaw, Sue; Hill, Corry, (ed.) HANDOUT FROM THE DEAFBLIND INTERVENTION STRATEGIES FOR THE HOME (DISH) MANUAL. This handout gives nine rules on sensory integration for interveners. The rules stress awareness, planning, learning through activity, combining senses, and having fun.

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1997-0486

Sensory Integrative Dysfunction in Young Children --Stephens, Linda. SEE/HEAR, Vol. 2, No. 4, Fall 1997, pp. 24-27. (1997) This article offers a description of sensory integration and sensory integrative dysfunction. Four categories of sensory integrative dysfunction are described: attention and regulatory problems, sensory defensiveness, activity patterns, and behavior. Available in Spanish. Available on the web: http://www.tsbvi.edu/seehear/fall97/sensory.htm.

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2009-0243

Treatment of Language Disorders in Children --McCauley, Rebecca J. (Ed.); Fey, Marc E. (Ed.) Baltimore: Paul. H. Brookes Publishing Co. (2006) This book provides an overview of 15 contemporary language interventions presented by authors who have contributed to the development of each approach. Each overview includes an introduction to children who the approaches are designed to benefit, the conditions in which the interventions are (or are not) likely to have their desired effects, and the evidence available to support claims of efficacy. The book is accompanied by a DVD containing 3-minute clips illustrating representative, significant, or visually memorable elements of each approach. The interventions covered are as follows: (1) Responsivity Education/Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching; (2) It Takes Two to Talk; (3) The Picture Exchange Communication System; (4) The System for Augmenting Language; (5) Language is the Key; (6) Focused Stimulation; (7) Enhanced Milieu Teaching; (8) Conversational Recast Intervention ; (9) Phonological Awareness Intervention; (10) Balanced Reading Intervention; (11) Visual Strategies to Facilitate Written Language Development; (12) The Writing Lab Approach; (13) Sensory integration; (14) Fast ForWord Language; and (15) Functional Communication Training.

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2002-0283

Understanding Deafblindness: Issues, Perspectives, and Strategies --Alsop, Linda, M.Ed. (Ed.) Logan, UT: SKI-HI Institute, Utah State University. (2002) A comprehensive 2-volume curriculum for parents, interveners, and service providers working with children and young adults who are deaf-blind. Aspects of deaf-blind programming covered include communication, concept development, vision, hearing, touch, sensory integration, intervention, family issues, physical education, additional disabilities, orientation and mobility, community support, and evaluation. Individual chapters were written by professionals with expertise in their respective subject areas. Available from Hope Publishing, Inc. Phone/Fax: 435-245-2888 .E-mail: hope@hopepubl.com. http://www.hopepubl.com. Cost: $175.00.

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2001-0459

Understanding the Nature of Sensory Integration With Diverse Populations --Roley, Susanne Smith (Ed.); Blanche, Erna Imperatore (Ed.); Schaaf, Roseann C. (Ed.) Therapy Skill Builders. (2001) An extensive review of the theoretical foundations and clinical applications of sensory integration therapy. Chapters by numerous contributers address relevant literature on a variety of topics. Theoretical topics include the philosophy of sensory integration, the implications of neuroplasticity and the environment, proprioception, and the concept of praxis. Clinical topics include information about assessment and intervention including a chapter on the use of sensory integration with high-risk infants and children, and individual chapters that focus on vision deficits, cerebral palsy, autism, and Fragile X Syndrome. Unfortunately, this lengthy, detailed book does not have an index. Publisher's web site: http://www.PsychCorp.com.  

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