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State Deaf-Blind Project Newsletter Articles and Fact Sheets on Intervener Services Bibliography

by DB-LINK on May 1, 2012
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This is a partial list of materials on this topic available from the DB-LINK Catalog Database.  If you have additional questions, please contact us via email: info@nationaldb.org

Updated 6/2012

2010-0166

10 Issues to Always Consider When Intervening for Students with Deafblindness --Wiley, David. TX SENSEABILITIES, vol. 4, #1, Winter 2010, pp.15-19. (2010) This article provides a framework for analyzing ten common issues a teacher, intervener, or caregiver must address when effectively supporting a student who is deafblind. These include: physical space, positioning, materials, devices and equipment, orientation & mobility, communication, trust and security, literacy, pacing and content of the activity or coursework, a teacher, intervener, or caregiver must address when effectively supporting a student who is deafblind. The most important role for those intervening with a student who is deafblind is to make accommodations to provide the best possible access to information, spaces, and materials. The author suggests that these accommodations should be planned in advance for the best visual, auditory, and tactile access. Questions are provided to help guide a team in planning the best sensory access for the student in all environments. Available on the web: http://www.tsbvi.edu/resources/3114-10-issues-to-always-consider-when-intervening-for-students-with-deafblindness

1994-0432

Access Is More Than a Ramp: Two Articles About Special Supports for Children with Deafblindness --Blaha, Robbie; Moss, Kate. P.S. NEWS!!!, vol. v, no. 2, April 1993, pp. 5-10, 15. (1993) These articles define the pivotal issue of inclusion of children who are deafblind as access. The first article makes the point that children with dual sensory impairments must have particular support services to access the full amount of information they are capable of utilizing. This requires specific support services so that they may acquire background information through their dominant language. The second article discusses the advantages of using an intervenor as a support service for the deafblind child who is just learning basic language skills.

1995-0140

Building Bridges to Independence --Simmons, Ellen. P.S. NEWS!!, vol. vii, no. 1, January 1995, pp. 3-5. (1995) Simmons is the parent of a boy who is deaf-blind. Here she relates their experiences with inclusion. Until age fifteen, her son, Matthew, was in a segregated program for those with severe disabilities. At that point she decided he needed to develop the social skills and interpersonal relationships which would make his life as an adult more fulfilling and more meaningful. She relates the experiences they had as he entered the public junior high school with the aid of special educators and intervenors, some of whom agreed with her educational philosophy and some who did not. Available in Spanish.

2007-0216

Christian and His Intervener --Knapp, Melanie. SEE/HEAR, Summer 2006, Vol. 11 #3, 2-5. (2006) One mother shares her reflections on her son's dramatic improvement in quality of life through the work of his intervener, and her son, "the great motivator", inspired her to help others reap the same benefits. Available in Spanish. Available on the web: http://www.tsbvi.edu/seehear/summer06/christian.htm

2002-0325

Effective Use of One-on-Ones for Children Who Are Deaf-Blind --Belote, Maurice. California Deaf-Blind Services. RESOURCES, vol. 10, #12, Winter 2002, pp. 1-7. (2002) This article discusses the role of one-on-one communication facilitators who work with children who are deaf-blind. It provides information on effectiveness, possible barriers, and strategies to consider. It also includes an interview with a one-on-one classroom assistant conducted by a California Deaf-Blind Services (CDBS) education specialist. In the interview, the classroom assistant discusses her role, daily routines, and challenges she has faced. Includes a Intervenor fact sheet in English and Spanish. Available on the web: http://www.sfsu.edu/~cadbs/Winter02.pdf

2006-0023

The Intervener: Big Idea, Substantial Results --D'Luna, Debra. CA: California Deaf-Blind Services. reSources, Winter 2006, Vol 12, #2, p.1-4. (2006) The author is a parent of an 18 year old daughter, Alexis, who is deaf-blind as a result of CHARGE Syndrome. In this article the author describes Alexis's educational experiences from pre-school through high school and the significant role interveners have played in making her educational experiences successful. The article describes various ways that Alexis's intervener facilitated her successful inclusion in academic and social settings. Available on the web: http://www.sfsu.edu/~cadbs/Winter06.pdf

2012-0113

Intervener's Motto: Do With, Not For --Rodriquez-Gil, Gloria. RESOURCES, vol. 16, #1, Spring 2011, Fact Sheet #42. (2011) This fact sheet describes the way interveners should strive to work with individuals who are deaf-blind. It takes a look at actual practice of an intervener. Providing clear information so that the individual who is deaf-blind understands what is happening; enough support so that he or she is the person in charge; provide enough time to respond; and provide a partnership to form a relationship. The doccument gives examples of the above practices. Available on the web: http://files.cadbs.org/200001344-c120ec21af/Fact%20Sheet%2042.pdf

2006-0024

Interveners Sharing Their Strategies --Hernandez, Amy. CA: California Deaf-Blind Services. reSources, Winter 2006, Vol 12, #2, p. 4. (2006) The author is an intervener for an 18 year old student who is deaf-blind as a result of CHARGE Syndrome. In this article the author describes strategies she has used to teach her student both academic and social skills. Available on the web: http://www.sfsu.edu/~cadbs/Winter06.pdf

2006-0026

Interveners Sharing Their Strategies --Oey, Bryan. CA: California Deaf-Blind Services. reSources, Winter 2006, Vol 12, #2, p. 7. (2006) The author is an intervener for a student who is deaf-blind who has difficulty attending for extended periods of time. He describes the strategies that have been utilized to increase the student's attention span. Available on the web: http://www.sfsu.edu/~cadbs/Winter06.pdf

2006-0027

Interveners Sharing Their Strategies --Muehlig, Casey. CA: California Deaf-Blind Services. reSources, Winter 2006, Vol 12, #2, p. 8. (2006) The author is an intervener for a 4th grade student who is deaf-blind. He describes the strategies that have been utilized to help the student make sense of the noises in the lunchroom and at recess. The author also describes the ways that have used to help the student interact with his peers. Available on the web: http://www.sfsu.edu/~cadbs/Winter06.pdf

2004-0526

Invitation to Participate in a Community of Practice on Interveners SEE/HEAR, vol. 9, #3, Summer 2004, pp. 34-35. (2004) This is an announcement of a Community of Practice for interveners and paraprofessionals working with deafblind youth and information about the function and need for communities of practice. Describes what a community of practice is, what they do, and who comprises membership. Discusses why these are used as a technical assistance strategy to identify the needs of the community and recommend practices. Available in Spanish. Available on the web: http://www.tsbvi.edu/seehear/summer04/invitation.htm

2006-0025

It's Only Natural: Interveners & Natural Supports for Learners with Deaf-Blindness --Hartmann, Liz. CA: California Deaf-Blind Services. reSources, Winter 2006, Vol 12, #2, pp. 5-7. (2006) This article addresses the complex issue of providing support to a student who is deaf-blind without inhibiting the student's ability to assert independence and to interact with others in the environment. Interveners have skills that enable them to know when to support and when to step back. Related research and additional resources are referenced. Available on the web: http://www.sfsu.edu/~cadbs/Winter06.pdf

2007-0217

Mentor, Teacher, or Student? --Weth, Michelle. SEE/HEAR, Summer 2006, Vol. 11 #3, 12-13. (2006) A general education teacher describes her experiences with a deafblind student in class, working together with an intervener. Available in Spanish. Available on the web: http://www.tsbvi.edu/seehear/summer06/mentor.htm

2010-0210

The Roles and Responsibilities of Team Members for a Student Who is Deaf-Blind --Rodriguez-Gill, Gloria. RESOURCES, vol. 14, #3, Fall 2009. (Fall 2009) This article details information about team members who are most likely to work directly and/or on a consultation basis with the student who is deaf-blind and their educational team. The main contributions that these personnel are expected to make are also included. The personnel discussed are: parent, classroom teacher, one-on-one assistant or intervener, itinerant teacher of the visually impaired, itinerant teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing, orientation and mobility specialist, specialist in deaf-blindness, speech-language pathologist or therapist, and occupational therapist. Available on the web: http://files.cadbs.org/200000988-ce367cf2f2/Roles_Resp.pdf

2006-0028

Things to Remember When Requesting an Intervener for Your Child --Brown, David. CA: California Deaf-Blind Services. reSources, FACT SHEET, Winter 2006, Vol 12, #2, p. (2006) The article offers parents ideas to use when communicating with educational professionals in support of their request for an intervener. Reasons why a child needs an intervener and common misconceptions when an intervener is requested are listed. Available in Spanish pp. 11-12. Available on the web: http://www.sfsu.edu/~cadbs/Winter06.pdf

1995-0129

Unique Educational and Services Needs of Children with Deaf-Blindness --Texas Deaf-Blind Project. P.S. NEWS!!, vol. vii, no. 1, January 1995, pp. 8-10. (1995) Originally drafted at a meeting on the use of interveners for students with deaf-blindness, this piece outlines the unique needs of deaf-blind students and the necessity of obtaining outside help for the school districts in Texas which typically do not have trained deaf-blind specialists on staff. Outreach staff from TSBVI are helpful in providing technical assistance. The importance of funding for services for these children under the Disabilities Act is emphasized. Available in Spanish. Available on the web: http://www.tsbvi.edu/seehear/archive/unique.html

2003-0242

Update: Educational Interveners in Texas --Blaha, Robbie. SEE/HEAR, vol. 7, #4, Fall 2002, pp. 18-21. (2002) This article provides an update on educational intervenors in Texas. Describes the efforts of the Texas Deafblind Project in supporting and expanding the services of an intervenor. Describes how to identify the training needs of intervenors, what training is available, and where intervenors are being used. A corresponding article describes how an intervenor can help bridge the social gap between deafblind children and other children in their classroom. Available in Spanish. Available on the web: http://www.tsbvi.edu/seehear/fall02/interveners.htm

2003-0129

Use of Interveners --Rodriguez-Gil, Gloria. California Deaf-Blind Services. RESOURCES, vol. 10, #12, Winter 2002, pp. 7-9. (2002) This fact sheet describes the use of intervenors. It first defines what an intervenor is, and the importance of an intervenor for a child who is deaf-blind. The roles and responsibilities of an intervenor are provided as well as work attitudes expected. Available in Spanish. Available on the web: http://www.sfsu.edu/~cadbs/Winter02.pdf#page=7

2004-0541

When Planning for Adult Life, How is a "Life-style" Different than a "Program"? --Wiley, David. SEE/HEAR, vol. 9, #1, Winter 2004, pp. 29-31. (2004) This article describes a "life-style" approach to developing programs instead of the more traditional group-based models. Describes the person-centered approach taken to develop individualized support and assistance through an intervener paid for by a Medicaid waiver. Discusses how this type of service can be offered in both urban and rural areas, is individualized to meet the needs of the deafblind person, and gets away from the more traditional system-centered approach of day-activity centers, sheltered workshops, and group homes. Available in Spanish. Available on the web: http://www.tsbvi.edu/seehear/winter04/planning.htm  

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