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Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching Bibliography

by DB-LINK on Feb 1, 2013
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This is a partial list of materials on this topic available from the DB-LINK Catalog Database.  If you have additional questions, please contact us via email: info@nationaldb.org

Updated 2/2013

2009-0315

Early Childhood Students: Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching --Turnbull, Ann; Turnbull, Rud; Wehmeyer, Michael L. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill. Exceptional Lives: Special Education in Today's Schools. (2010)This short book section provides a succinct overview of prelinguistic milieu teaching (PMT), a strategy to teach children with intellectual disabilities to communicate with gestures or sounds. It includes a table outlining the following 7 PMT steps: prompt the child to communicate, prompt the child to initiate, vocally imitate the child's resultant vocalizations, comply with the child's request, recode the child's communication act, acknowledge the child's communicative act, and talk to the child.

2009-0255

Early effects of Responsivity Education/Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching for Children with Developmental Delays and Their Parents --Fey, Marc E.; Warren, Steven F.; Brady, Nancy; Finestack, Lizbeth H.; Bredin-Oja, Shelley L.; Fairchild, Martha; Sokol, Shari; Yoder, Paul J. JOURNAL OF SPEECH, LANGUAGE, AND HEARING RESEARCH, vol. 49, June 2006, pp. 526-547. (2006) The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a 6-month course of responsivity education/prelinguistic milieu teaching (RE/PMT) for children with developmental delay and RE/PMT's effects on parenting stress in a randomized clinical trial. Fifty-one children, age 24-33 months, with no more than 10 expressive words or signs, were randomly assigned to treatment/no-treatment groups. Thirteen children in each group had a diagnosis of Down syndrome. The results showed that in 1 of 2 multivariate comparisons, the RE/PMT group exhibited superior gains in communication compared with the no-treatment group. The treatment effect for overall use of intentional communication acts in the child-examiner context was significant (d = .68, 95% confidence interval = 0.12-1.24). There were no effects on parenting stress associated with the intervention or the presence or absence of Down syndrome. The author's concluded that RE/PMT may be applied clinically with the expectation of medium-size effects on the child's rate of intentional communication acts after 6 months of intervention and that this approach warrants further investigation with modifications.

2009-0254

Effects of Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching and Parent Responsivity Education on Dyads Involving Children With Intellectual Disabilities --Yoder, Paul J.; Warren, Steven F. JOURNAL OF SPEECH, LANGUAGE, AND HEARING RESEARCH, vol. 45, December 2002, pp. 1158-1174. (2002) This study tested the effect of responsivity education for parents and prelinguistic milieu teaching for their children (RPMT) to facilitate the children's prelinguistic communication and productive language development. Thirty-nine toddlers with intellectual disabilities and their primary caregivers participated in the study. Parent-child pairs were randomly assigned to either the RPMT groups or a control group. Communication and language were assessed at study entry and at 6, 9, and 12 months later. RPMT facilitated parental responsivity in the posttreatment period. The effect of RPMT on the growth rate of child-initiated comments varied by pretreatment measures of that variable. The effect of RPMT on the growth rate of child-initiated requests varied by presence or absence of Down syndrome. Finally, the effect of RPMT on growth of productive language varied by pretreatment frequency of canonical vocal communication. Recommended alterations in PMT and implications for defining which nonspeaking children are appropriate for prelinguistic goals and treatment are discussed.

2009-0252

Facilitating the Transition from Preintentional to Intentional Communication --Warren, S. F.; Yoder, Paul J. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. Transitions in Prelinguistic Communication (Communication and Language Intervention Series, vol. 7). Amy M. Weatherby, Steven F. Warren, & Joe Reichle (Eds.). (1998) This book chapter describes prelinguistic milieu teaching (PMT), an instructional approach the authors developed to facilitate the transition from preintentional to intentional communication for infants with developmental delays. It includes a discussion of PMT techniques: enabling contexts (arranging the environment, following the child's attentional lead, building social routines); teaching techniques (e.g., prompts, models, consequences); and teaching intentional communication (requesting, commenting). The chapter also includes sections on the transactional effects of PMT and the cumulative deficit hypothesis.

2009-0189

Increasing Communication in Children with Concurrent Vision and Hearing Loss --Brady, Nancy C.; Bashinski, Susan M. RESEARCH AND PRACTICE FOR PERSONS WITH SEVERE DISABILITIES, vol. 33, #1-2, pp. 59-70. (2008) Nine children with complex communication needs and concurrent vision and hearing losses participated in an intervention program aimed at increasing intentional pre-linguistic communication. The intervention constituted a pilot, descriptive study of an adapted version of prelinguistic milieu teaching (A-PMT). In A-PMT, natural gestures and vocalizations were targeted in child-focused, one-on-one activities conducted by a member of the project staff. Adaptations included using more physical prompts than in other forms of PMT and using means other than directed eye gaze to determine directionality of gestures. All nine participants increased their rates of initiated, intentional communication substantially during the course of intervention; in addition, each participant acquired new forms of natural gestures. Results were limited primarily to requests (as opposed to other communication functions). Discussion centers on how to promote more generalized communication developments in future implementations of the program.

2009-0260

Maternal Responsivity Predicts the Prelinguistic Communication Intervention That Facilitates Generalized Intentional Communication --Yoder, Paul J.; Warren, Steven F. JOURNAL OF SPEECH, LANGUAGE, AND HEARING RESEARCH, vol. 41, October 1998, pp. 1207-1219. (1998) This study examined whether maternal responsivity would predict the extent to which prelinguistic milieu teaching (PMT) facilitated generalized intentional communication better than a contrast small-group treatment with 58 children (ages 17 to 36 months) with developmental disabilities. If mothers were relatively responsive before treatment, PMT was superior. If mothers were relatively unresponsive, the small group treatment was superior.

2009-0259

A Randomized Comparison of the Effect of Two Prelinguistic Communication Interventions on the Acquisition of Spoken Communication in Preschoolers with ASD --Yoder, Paul; Stone, Wendy L. JOURNAL OF SPEECH, LANGUAGE, AND HEARING RESEARCH, vol. 49, August 2006, pp. 698-711. (2006) This randomized group experiment compared the efficacy of two communication interventions (Responsive Education and Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching [RPMT] and the Picture Exchange Communication System [PECS]) on spoken communication in 36 preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Each treatment was delivered to children for a maximum total of 24 hours over a 6-month period. Spoken communication was assessed in a rigorous test of generalization at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 6-month follow-up periods. Results: PECS was more successful than RPMT in increasing the number of nonimitative spoken communication acts and the number of different nonimitative words used at the posttreatment period. Considering growth over all 3 measurement periods, an exploratory analysis showed that growth rate of the number of different nonimitative words was faster in the PECS group than in the RPMT group for children who began treatment with relatively high object exploration. In contrast, analo

2009-0258

Randomized Comparison of Two Communication Interventions for Preschoolers With Autism Spectrum Disorders --Yoder, Paul; Stone, Wendy L. JOURNAL OF COUNSELING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 74, #3, pp. 426-435. (2006) This randomized group experiment compared the efficacy of 2 communication interventions (Responsive Education and Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching [RPMT] and the Picture Exchange Communication System [PECS]) in 36 preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders. Each treatment was delivered 3 times per week, in 20-minute sessions, for 6 months. The purpose was to determine the relative efficacy of RPMT and PECS for facilitating the development of turn-taking, requesting, and initiating joint attention. The results revealed that the RPMT facilitated the frequency of generalized turn-taking and generalized initiating joint attention more than did the PECS. The latter effect occurred only for children who began treatment with at least some initiating joint attention. In contrast, the PECS facilitated generalized requests more than the RPMT in children with very little initiating joint attention prior to treatment. These effect sizes were large.

2009-0256

A Randomized Trial of Longitudinal Effects of Low-Intensity Responsivity Education/Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching --Warren, Steven F.; Fey, Marc E.; Finestack, Lizbeth H.; Brady, Nancy C.; Bredin-Oja, Shelley L.; Fleming, Kandace K. JOURNAL OF SPEECH, LANGUAGE, AND HEARING RESEARCH, vol. 51, April 2008, pp. 451-470. (2008) The purpose of this study was to evaluate the longitudinal effects of a 6-month course of responsivity education (RE)/prelinguistic milieu teaching (PMT) for young children with developmental delay. Fifty-one children, age 24-33 months, with fewer than 10 expressive words were randomly assigned to early-treatment/no-treatment groups. Follow-up data were collected 6 and 12 months after the conclusion of the initial 6-month treatment/no-treatment conditions. The results showed no effects of the treatment at 6 or 12 months. Conclusion: M. E. Fey et al. (2006) reported that 6 months of RE/PMT led to a significant treatment effect in the use of intentional communication in 1 of 2 communication sampling contexts. This finding, combined with evidence from other studies, suggests that RE/PMT may be applied clinically at low intensity with the expectation of medium-sized effects on children's rate of intentional communication acts over the short term. The results of the present study, however, provide no evidence for the anticipated longer term benefits of this intervention. Further investigation of the approach at higher intensity levels and for longer periods of time is warranted.

2009-0251

Responsivity Education/Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching --Warren, Steven F.; Bredin-Oja, Shelley L.; Fairchild, Martha; Finestack, Lizbeth H.; Fey, Marc E.; Brady, Nancy C. Baltimore: Paul. H. Brookes Publishing Co. Treatment of Language Disorders in Children. R. J. McCauley & M. E. Fey (Eds.). (2006) Responsivity education/prelinguistic milieu teaching (RE/PMT) consists of two components: prelinguistic milieu teaching (PMT), which is delivered by a clinician to a child, and responsivity education (RE), which is delivered by a clinician to the child's parents. This book chapter describes both of these interventions. PMT is designed to increase the frequency and complexity of intentional nonverbal communication to set the stage for later language learning. RE is designed to enhance parents' responsive interaction skills. The chapter includes a detailed description of PMT teaching procedures.

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