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Advocacy and Rights

by on May 1, 2009
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1993-2759
 
COMMUNICATION: Reaction --Collins, Steven. Proceedings of the National Symposium on Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind, Tysons Corner, VA, December 1992. J. Reiman and P. Johnson (Eds.) (1992) Discusses the need for deaf-blind people to be exposed to their natural language, American Sign Language. Also talks about his belief that parents and family members of people who are deaf-blind must build a rapport with, and interact with, members of the deaf-blind community. 

2014-0068
 
DEAF-BLIND POWER NOW --Pellerin, Joan. RID VIEWS, vol. 28, #2, Spring 2011, p. 22. (2011) This one page article advocates for individuals who are deaf-blind to be included and not isolated. The model of support service providers (SSPs) needs to expand. In addition, hearing interpreters and deaf interpreters must work together in the furthering of deaf-blind individuals access to the varied offerings of daily life. 

2014-0201
 
ENHANCING THE SELF-ADVOCACY EXPERIENCE FOR DEAFBLIND TRAINERS -- National Consortium of Interpreter Education Centers. (2013) In 2013, the NCIEC adapted the Deaf Self-Advocacy Training (DSAT) curriculum for DeafBlind audiences. This enhancement provides DeafBlind Self-Advocacy (DBSAT) trainers and DeafBlind participants with greater access to the DSAT Curriculum Toolkit, Second Edition (2012). It offers suggested training approaches for DeafBlind audiences, summaries of the numerous video vignettes used throughout the curriculum, tips for training, and additional resources. Located on its own disk in the DSAT Curriculum Toolkit, the materials are available in large print and electronic Braille. Hard copy Braille is available upon request at: deafselfadvocacy@gmail.com. Available on the web: http://www.interpretereducation.org/deaf-self-advocacy/curriculum-overview/

1997-0006
 
FURTHER AND HIGHER EDUCATION FOR PEOPLE WITH USHER SYNDROME: Interview with Emma Hancock --Talbot-Williams, Sarah; Hancock, Emma. TALKING SENSE, vol. 42, #3, Autumn 1996, pp.24-26. The author interviews a young woman, Emma Hancock, who has Usher Type 1 and who is a college student in London. The student discusses her difficulties in choosing the right school for her needs and finding financial support for the special services she requires, such as tutoring, interpreting, and note taking. Her difficulties in dealing with the attitudes of her fellow students and instructors and in coping with communication issues are included. The article ends with 11 tips that Ms. Hancock offers others in her situation. Available on the web: http://www.sense.org.uk/publications/allpubs/magazine/tsarticles/1996/usherfured.htm

2002-0327

GUIDELINES: Practical Tips for Working and Socializing with Deaf-Blind People --Smith, Theresa B. Burtonsville, MD: Sign Media, Inc. (2002) This second edition of Guidelines includes expanded chapters on topics such as tactile sign language, interpreting, conversation and physical environment. New information and more examples are included. Three new chapters include: Support Service Providers; Authority, Power and Control; and Meetings. The book is intended for people who know Sign Language, who are already experienced in "deafness" and in interacting with Deaf people, and who want to know more about "deaf-blindness" and interpreting for Deaf-Blind people. Professional interpreters, student interpreters, and anyone who wants to communicate and/or work more effectively with Deaf-Blind people will benefit from reading this book. May be ordered from Sign Media, Inc., 4020 Blackburn Lane, Burtonsville, MD 20866. Phone: (800) 475-4756. Cost: $24.95 Publisher's web site: http://www.signmedia.com

1996-0810
 
IMPROVING ACCESS FOR DEAF-BLIND PEOPLE --Deaf-Blind Service Center. Seattle, WA: Northlight Productions. (1995) This video is intended for hearing and sighted people who work in recreational facilities, such as zoos and museums. It explains how to provide service and improve access to facilities for deaf-blind consumers. Communication methods, use of a tty, how to tell when a deaf-blind person needs help and how to provide it, and deaf-blind culture are discussed. Ways of improving access, such as how to get printed materials made into braille or large print, provision of good lighting, easy-to-read signage, interpreters and guides, are offered. 

1993-1366
 
THE INTERPRETER, OUR BEST AND MOST IMPORTANT AID FOR COMMUNICATION --Johansson, Katarina. THE INTERNATIONAL NEWSLETTER FOR THE DEAF-BLIND, 1. ((Spring 1991)) Author is Swedish. She describes the need for adequate interpreters internationally. Then she goes on to describe the way interpreters are used in Sweden to help the deaf-blind. The article conludes with the idea that there are still not enough interpreters for all those deaf-blind who could use them. 

2004-0253
 
NATURAL MORAL LAW AND THE RIGHT OF DEAFBLIND PEOPLE TO THE SERVICE OF GUIDE-INTERPRETERS --Jakes, Jan. DBI REVIEW, #32, July-December 2003, pp. 26-27. (2003) In this article the author answers the question, "why do deafblind people need the services of guide-interpreters?". The author gives information on guide-interpreters, discusses a person's environment, and addresses the rights of people who are deafblind. Also outlines how legislation should address the issues of deaf-blind people. 

1996-0782
 
AN OPEN LETTER TO OUR PARENTS: What We Wish You Had Known --Collins, Myra; Delgadillo, David; Frawley, Matt; Kinney, Ginger; Lugo, Joey; Lundgren, Jean; Price, Kathy; Rybarski, Shirley. USHER FAMILY SUPPORT. (September 1, 1994) This letter composed by a group of people with Usher Syndrome who meet weekly at the Helen Keller National Center advise parents to inform their Usher children about their disability, what it is called, that it is genetic, and that it can get progressively worse. The stress and embarrassment produced by symptoms of their condition in the teenage years (night blindness, clumsiness, difficulty in poor lighting) and the insensitivity of teachers unknowledgable about the condition is discussed. None of the contributors received special services before age 17 and they feel that orientation amd mobility training should start earlier with parents' support. They advise parents of deafblind children to learn and use sign language and to insure that their children learn tactual sign, sign tracking techniques, and braille while they are still in school and before they actually need it. They also discuss the emotional ramifications of diagnosis and worsening vision: anger, frustration, and depression, sometimes suicidal, and stress that it is important that parents learn how their children feel and earn their trust by being honest with them about their condition. Available in Spanish.

2014-0107
 
PRO-TACTILE: The DeafBlind Way (Vlog #1) --Nuccio, Jelica; granda, aj. Seattle, WA: (2013) This online vlog is one in a series of online vlogs describing what Pro-Tactile means within the DeafBlind community. "Pro-Tactile" in this context means the value of touch for purposes of communication. During this conversation, Jelica and aj give each other tactile feedback the whole time, tapping on each other’s legs, and hands, and shoulders, and arms with one hand and simultaneously signing with their other hand. Available on the web: http://www.protactile.org/2016/03/pro-tactile-vlog-1.html 

2014-0108
 
PRO-TACTILE: The DeafBlind Way (Vlog #2) --Nuccio, Jelica; granda, aj. Seattle, WA: (2013) This online vlog is the second in a series of online vlogs describing what Pro-Tactile means within the DeafBlind community. "Pro-Tactile" in this context means the value of touch for purposes of communication. During this brief presentation, Jelica and aj discuss the meaning of back-channeling as the number one most important Pro-Tactile [PT] practice. Available on the web: http://www.protactile.org/2016/03/english-transcription-of-aj-and-jelicas.html 

2014-0109
 
PRO-TACTILE: The DeafBlind Way (Vlog #3) --Nuccio, Jelica; granda, aj. Seattle, WA: (2013) This online vlog is the third in a series of online vlogs describing what Pro-Tactile means within the DeafBlind community. "Pro-Tactile" in this context means the value of touch for purposes of communication. During this brief presentation, Jelica and aj talk about the difference between haptics and Pro-Tactile. Available on the web: http://www.protactile.org/2016/03/pro-tactile-vlog-3.html

2014-0110

PRO-TACTILE: The DeafBlind Way (Vlog #4) --Nuccio, Jelica; granda, aj. Seattle, WA: (2013) This online vlog is the fourth in a series of online vlogs describing what Pro-Tactile means within the DeafBlind community. "Pro-Tactile" in this context means the value of touch for purposes of communication. During this brief conversation, Jelica and aj continue the conversation regarding back-channeling begun on a previous vlog in order to respond to questions they received about the practice. Available on the web: http://www.protactile.org/2016/03/pro-tactile-vlog-4.html 

2001-0042 

TEAM STRUCTURE FOR A DEAF-BLIND STUDENT --Dunn, Betsy J., CSC. VIEWS, vol. 17, #3, March 2000, pp. 16-17. (2000) This article provides examples and role definitions for support team members for a deafblind student. Roles of the student, parent, administrator/case manager, primary support teacher, interpreters, vision teacher, and mobility instructor are defined in detail. Various methods to define, establish and communicate the role of each team member to general educators are provided. Sample topics to address in a guidebook for inclusion of a deafblind student are included. 

1999-0606
 
TIPS FOR STUDENTS WITH USHER SYNDROME: Information Sheet --Baumgarner, Juli. California Deaf-Blind Services. Fact Sheets from Colorado Services to Children with Deafblindness. (2002) Lists accommodations and adaptations that can be made in a classroom for students with Usher Syndrome. Includes suggestions for lighting, seating, classroom environment, materials, sign language techniques, orientation and mobility, and self advocacy. Available on the web: http://www.unr.edu/ndsip/tipsheets/usher.pdf. 

1996-0395 

USING INTERPRETERS WITH DEAF-BLIND CLIENTS: What Professional Service Providers Should Know --Bourquin, Eugene A. RE:VIEW, Vol. XXVII, #4, Winter 1996, pp.149-154. (1996) This article provides recommendations for using interpreters with deaf-blind clients. It describes the importance of using professional interpreters and not accepting an unqualified "signer" with good intentions. The communication process suffers without professional interpreters.

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