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Coordination of Interpreting Services


Coordination of Interpreting Services

by DB-LINK on May 1, 2009
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1995-0551

COMMUNICATION SERVICES WITH DEAFBLIND PEOPLE IN MIND: Some Perspectives from the USA, Guest, Mary. 1995, 2. 

Guest briefly presents the main points of a talk given by interpreters Susan Brooks and Rita Jo Scarcella at HKNC. She notes the increase in the need for and the availability of training of interpreters for people who are deaf or deafblind. The article includes a list of suggested criteria for any service agency setting up a communications and interpreting service.   TALKING SENSE, vol. 41, no.1, Spring 1995, pp. 16-17.

2006-0009

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF THE STAFF INTERPRETERS AT THE HELEN KELLER NATIONAL CENTER,  Hecker-Cain, Jane; Rubinberg, Ilissa. 2005, 2.  

Describes the challenges of coordinating interpreting services at a center-based program that includes consumers and staff who are deaf-blind, Deaf, blind and hearing. Includes the logistics of interpreting in a variety of individual and group settings as well specific adaptive equipment and techniques for facilitating individual styles and preferences. VIEWS, Vol.  22, #11, December 2005, pp. 35-36

1996-0152

HIRING INTERPRETERS FOR INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF-BLIND, Raistrick, Kathryn. 1995, 4.  

The effectiveness of qualified interpreters for communication between rehabilitation professionals and deaf-blind clients is discussed. Provision for an interpreter is required under the American Disabilities Act (ADA). Option for use of a paid interpreter instead of a friend or family member should be extended to the consumer, guaranteeing the consumer confidentiality. A qualified interpreter for the deaf-blind needs additional training and experience over the certification requirements of the National Registry of Interpreters of the Deaf (RID). The interpreter must be able to communicate using the mode of the consumer's choice, include visual information as well as auditory, express the emotional tone of the message tactually, use lighting and/ or distance to best advantage, and use sighted guide technique and emergency procedures to transport the client from place to place. Strategies for finding, paying, and working with interpreters is included.  AMERICAN REHABILITATION, vol. 21, #2, Summer 1995, pp. 19-22.

1996-0810   

IMPROVING ACCESS FOR DEAF-BLIND PEOPLE, Deaf-Blind Service Center. -- Northlight Productions: 1995, 17.30 mins.  

This 17-minute video is intended for hearing and sighted people who work in recreational facilities, such as zoos and museums. It explains how to provide service and improve access to facilities for deaf-blind consumers. Communication methods, use of a TTY, how to tell when a deaf-blind person needs help and how to provide it, and deaf-blind culture are discussed. Ways of improving access, such as how to get printed materials made into Braille or large print, provision of good lighting, easy-to-read signage, interpreters and guides, are offered.  

1994-0055

INTERPRETING AND TRANSLITERATING FOR PERSONS WHO ARE DEAF-BLIND, Raistrick, Kathryn L., (Ed.). no date, 13. This brochure is an aid for those who are interpreting for persons who are deaf-blind. Interpreting for this population requires specialized competence and responsibilities. This is an effort to delineate these skills, as well as to discuss considerations for the interpreter both before and at the assignment. Modes of communication for persons who are deaf-blind vary widely due to the etiology of the deaf-blindness, the severity of the vision and hearing loss, as well as the age of onset. A comprehensive listing is included of most of the modes of communication used in the United States with persons who are deaf-blind. This list is not exhaustive, however, it will give the interpreter an overview of some of the varieties of communication options available. The information would also be of value to persons hiring interpreters as well as consumers. Few individuals know how demanding interpreting for persons who are deaf-blind can be. Appropriate preparation by all parties before an interpreting situation could make the interpreting situation much more effective. 13 pages.  

2008-0132

INTERPRETING FOR INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF-BLIND: Standard Practice Paper -- Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc. 2007, 3.  The amount and type of vision and hearing a person has determines the type of interpreting that will be most effective. This document provides an overview of interpreting for individuals who are deaf-blind including communication modes, environmental considerations, professional standards for interpreters, and a brief description of support service providers (an additional service that an individual who is deaf-blind may request). 3 pages. Available at: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3DKvZMflFLdeGhDU1BUOTJKNEk/view?usp=sharing

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