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Culture and Community

by DB-LINK on Sep 1, 2014
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This section includes both print and video materials that look at the lives and experiences of deaf-blind people.

2010-0025

ACHIEVING CULTURAL COMPETENCE: An Interview on Interpreters Working With Deaf-Blind People, Jacobs, Rhonda. 2009, 7. This document from the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf is the text of an interview that Rhonda Jacobs conducted with Jamie Pope, Executive Director of the American Association of the Deaf-Blind, and Aimee Chappelow Bader, who has Usher Syndrome and is an adjunct assistant professor and ASL tutor with the Interpreter Training Program at Johnson County Community College in Kansas. Rhonda talked with Jamie and Aimee about deaf-blind culture, interactions with deaf-blind people, and how interpreters can integrate knowledge of deaf-blindness into their work.

2000-0016

AT THEIR FINGERTIPS-- TV Sea: 18 minutes. A video portraying the views of people who live with Usher Syndrome. It describes the difficulties and adjustment associated with becoming blind while deaf. Four people are interviewed and tell (with the assistance of interpreters) what life is like for them.

1993-2759

COMMUNICATION: REACTION, Collins, Steven. 1992. Discusses the need for deaf-blind people to be exposed to their natural language, American Sign Language. Also talks about his belief that parents and family members of people who are deaf-blind must build a rapport with, and interact with, members of the deaf-blind community. Proceedings of the National Symposium on Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind, Tysons Corner, VA, December 1992. J. Reiman and P. Johnson (Eds.)

2008-0448

CROSSING THE DIVIDE: Helen Keller and Yvonne Pitrois Dialogue on Diversity, Hartig, Rachel M. 2007, 8. How do those who are living with a difference most effectively cross the cultural divide and explain themselves to mainstream society? This is a central question raised by Yvonne Pitrois in her biography of Helen Keller, titled "Une nuit rayonnante: Helen Keller" [A Shining Night: Helen Keller]. Helen Keller responded to Pitrois' book in a fascinating letter. Although this article focuses primarily on these two texts, it goes beyond these works and the conflict they reveal to indicate, albeit somewhat briefly, Keller's and Pitrois' respective views on living with disability and the personality and cultural differences that influenced their divergent opinions. Sign Language Studies, Vol. 7, No. 2, Winter 2007, pp. 177-185.

2009-0212

DEAF AMERICAN POETRY: An Anthology, Clark, John Lee (Ed.) -- Gallaudet University Press: 2009, 294. This collection presents 95 poems by 35 Deaf American poets from the signing community over the past two centuries. It includes 4 poems by John Lee Clark, a deaf-blind poet and the editor of this collection. Brief biographies of each poet are included.

2009-0314

THE DEAFBLIND AND AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE --Tabak, John. Westport, CT: Praeger. Significant Gestures: A History of American Sign Language. (2006) pp. 157-180. This book chapter begins with an overview of deaf-blindness and its impact on the acquisition of language.  Following the introduction are brief biographies of Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller and descriptions of the Tadoma Method and tactile American Sign Language (ASL).  The latter addresses difficulties encountered when ASL is expressed tactilely including distinguishing between questions and statements, providing feedback to the signer as information is conveyed ("back-channel feedback"), and comprehending signs made near the face.  The chapter concludes with a brief biography of Harry C. Anderson.

1993-2980

DEAF-BLIND COMMUNICATION AND COMMUNITY: Getting Involved - A Conversation, Smith, Theresa. 1993. This ninety-minute tape offers two presentations of a forty-five minute conversation with Pat Cave and Janice Adams, two Deaf-Blind individuals. Moderated by Theresa Smith, this tape presents a discussion of topics such as general perceptions and experiences of deaf-blind adults and their communication frustration and needs. In addition, the two interpreters, one who is deaf and the other who is hearing, share some of their experiences and perceptions. The first portion of this tape is a full-screen, edited version of the conversation. The second portion uses special digital effects to present all five individuals on screen at the same time. Available from Sign Media Inc. for $59.95 ($98.95 when purchased as part of a set of 2 tapes). Phone: (800) 475-4756. Publisher's web site: http://www.signmedia.com/

1993-2979

DEAF-BLIND COMMUNICATION AND COMMUNITY: Overview and Introduction, Smith, Theresa. 1993. This is a forty-minute open-captioned tape that features Theresa Smith discussing a number of topics that provide a glimpse into the multi-faceted Deaf-Blind community. Among topics discussed are a definition and description of the community, individual communicative differences and preferences, becoming involved in the community, and setting limits. This tape also makes use of video footage to illustrate guiding and communication preferences. Available from Sign Media Inc. for $49.95 ($98.95 when purchased as part of a set of 2 tapes). Phone: (800) 475-4756. Publisher's web site: http://www.signmedia.com/

1995-0222

DEAF-BLIND COMMUNITY: In Touch, Neidermaier, Jan (Trans.) 1993, 10. This is an interview with two members of the deaf-blind community in which they share their perceptions of their lives and experiences working with interpreters. NAT-CENT NEWS, vol. 24, no. 1, September 1993, pp. 20-29.

2014-0068 

DEAF-BLIND POWER NOW / Pellerin, Joan 2011, 1. This one page article advocates for individuals who are deaf-blind to be included and not isolated. The model of support service providers (SSPs) needs to expand. In addition, hearing interpreters and deaf interpreters must work together in the furthering of deaf-blind individuals access to the varied offerings of daily life. RID VIEWS, vol. 28, #2, Spring 2011, p. 22 

1993-1677

DEAF-BLINDNESS: An Emerging Culture? Macdonald, Roderick (deaf-blind) 1989, 17. This paper traces the emergence of deaf-blind people through education, employment and social union into a modern community and culture. It takes note of individual accomplishments as well as the achievements of organizations for the deaf-blind. The article notes several characteristics unique to the deaf-blind culture: touch, group communication, dependence on interpreters, social mores imposed by deaf-blindness, games, class barriers, reduced general knowledge, economics, and language. The Deaf Way. Paper presented by Roderick Macdonald, president American Association of the Deaf-Blind, July 11, 1989

2011-0098 

DOES DISABILITY REALLY NEED TO BE FIXED? / Clark, John Lee. 2009, 1. This one page article is written by a deaf-blind adult. He discusses medical advances and the desire by some in the medical profession to eradicate deafness . The author celebrates his deafness as well as blindness and believes it is an important fabric of human life. RID VIEWS, vol. 26, #4, Fall 2009, p. 20 

2002-0327

GUIDELINES: Practical Tips for Working and Socializing with Deaf-Blind People, Smith, Theresa B. -- Sign Media, Inc: 2002, 288. This second edition of Guidelines includes expanded chapters on topics such as tactile sign language, interpreting, conversation and physical environment. New information and more examples are included. Three new chapters include: Support Service Providers; Authority, Power and Control; and Meetings. The book is intended for people who know Sign Language, who are already experienced in "deafness" and in interacting with Deaf people, and who want to know more about "deaf-blindness" and interpreting for Deaf-Blind people. Professional interpreters, student interpreters, and anyone who wants to communicate and/or work more effectively with Deaf-Blind people will benefit from reading this book. May be ordered from Sign Media, Inc., 4020 Blackburn Lane, Burtonsville, MD 20866. Phone: (800) 475-4756. Cost: $24.95 Publisher's web site: http://www.signmedia.com

2014-0076

INTERVIEW WITH TERRA EDWARDS/ Salas, Daniel. 2011, November 21. THE WENNER-GREN BLOG, Published online at: http://blog.wennergren.org/2011/11/interview-with-terra-edwards/ Terra Edwards discusses what led her to her dissertation research, "Language, Embodiment, and Sociality in a Tactile Life-world: Communication Practices in Everyday Life among Deaf-Blind People in Seattle, Washington," the relationships between anthropology, communications and the Deaf-Blind community, and some of the findings of her research that she found surprising.

2014-0062

INTRODUCTION TO THE SEATTLE DEAF-BLIND COMMUNITY AND THE ROLE OF THE SUPPORT SERVICE PROVIDER/ Deaf-Blind Service Center. 2010, 7 minutes, 5 seconds. This video describes the Seattle Deaf-Blind Community and the Role of the Support Service Provider.  Seattle has had a Support Service Provider (SSP) program for the past 20 years and the community wishes to share their knowledge and experience so that other individuals who are deaf-blind in other parts of the country can begin to receive Support Service Provider assistance.  The video briefly describes the variations in how a person who is deaf-blind communicates depending on their level of vision and/or hearing.  This document is available on the web at: https://vimeo.com/84484829

2014-0069 

IT'S HOW YOU SEE IT... OR FEEL IT / Jacobs, Rhonda. 2012, 2. This two page article discusses how framing gives us our perspective and "how we interpret the world." Bio-cultural diversity is explained and the recent creation of Pro-Tactile in the deaf-blind community is highlighted. RID VIEWS, vol. 29, #2, Spring 2012, pp. 21-22 

2001-0475

THE MIND TRAVELLER: The Ragin' Cajun, Sacks, Oliver. -- BBC Worldwide Americas, Inc. 1998, 50 min. This video takes a look at Usher Syndrome through the experiences of Danny Delcambre, a deaf-blind restaurant owner in Seattle, Washington. Neurologist/author Oliver Sacks explores the nature of deaf-blind culture, American Sign Language, and tactile signing with several deaf-blind adults in both Louisiana and Washington. This is available for loan or videostreaming via the Described and Captioned Media Program (DCMP; http://www.dcmp.org/). Requires membership in DCMP, which is free to qualified applicants.

1996-0782

AN OPEN LETTER TO OUR PARENTS: What We Wish You Had Known, Collins, Myra; Delgadillo, David; Frawley, Matt; Kinney, Ginger; Lugo, Joey; Lundgren, Jean; Price, Kathy; Rybarski, Shirley. September 1, 1994, 3. This letter composed by a group of people with Usher Syndrome who meet weekly at the Helen Keller National Center advises parents to inform their Usher children about their disability, what it is called, that it is genetic, and that it can get progressively worse. The stress and embarrassment produced by symptoms of their condition in the teenage years (night blindness, clumsiness, difficulty in poor lighting) and the insensitivity of teachers unknowledgeable about the condition is discussed. None of the contributors received special services before age 17 and they feel that orientation and mobility training should start earlier with parents' support. They advise parents of deafblind children to learn and use sign language and to insure that their children learn tactual sign, sign tracking techniques, and Braille while they are still in school and before they actually need it. They also discuss the emotional ramifications of diagnosis and worsening vision: anger, frustration, and depression, sometimes suicidal, and stress that it is important that parents learn how their children feel and earn their trust by being honest with them about their condition. Available in Spanish. USHER FAMILY SUPPORT

1994-0477

AN OPEN LETTER TO THE DEAF COMMUNITY: We Have Usher Syndrome, Chiocciola, Theona; Harrison, Syble; Kesner, Beverly; Lejeune, Janice; Stender, Andrew; Tunison, Winifred; Herrada, Rosenda; Levine, Frank; Lugo, Joey. 1994, 4. A group of people with Usher Syndrome describe their feelings concerning the Deaf community's lack of understanding about the loss of sight experienced by those with Usher. They suggest ways that members of the Deaf community could interact with people who have Usher Syndrome. USHER FAMILY SUPPORT, vol. 1, no. 4, Winter 1993-94, pp. 4, 9-11.

2014-0107

PRO-TACTILE: THE DEAFBLIND WAY (VLOG #1)

/ Nuccio, Jelica; granda, aj. 2013, 9 minutes, 44 seconds.

This online vlog is one in a series of online vlogs describing what Pro-Tactile means within the DeafBlind community. "Pro-Tactile" in this context means the value of touch for purposes of communication. During this conversation, Jelica and aj give each other tactile feedback the whole time, tapping on each other’s legs, and hands, and shoulders, and arms with one hand and simultaneously signing with their other hand. This document is available on the web at: http://www.protactile.org/2016/03/pro-tactile-vlog-1.html

2014-0108

PRO-TACTILE: THE DEAFBLIND WAY (VLOG #2) / Nuccio, Jelica; granda, aj. 2013, 5 minutes. This online vlog is the second  in a series of online vlogs describing what Pro-Tactile means within the DeafBlind community.  "Pro-Tactile" in this context means the value of touch for purposes of communication. During this brief presentation, Jelica and aj discuss the meaning of back-channeling as the number one most important Pro-Tactile [PT] practice.  This document is available on the web at: http://www.protactile.org/2016/03/english-transcription-of-aj-and-jelicas.html

2014-0109

PRO-TACTILE: THE DEAFBLIND WAY (VLOG #3) / Nuccio, Jelica; granda, aj. 2013, 5 minutes, 35 seconds. This online vlog is the third in a series of online vlogs describing what Pro-Tactile means within the DeafBlind community. "Pro-tactile" in this context means the value of touch for purposes of communication. During this brief presentation, Jelica and aj talk about the difference between haptics and Pro-Tactile.  This document is available on the web at: http://www.protactile.org/2016/03/pro-tactile-vlog-3.html

2014-0110

PRO-TACTILE: THE DEAFBLIND WAY (VLOG #4) / Nuccio, Jelica; granda, aj. 2013, 5 minutes, 17 seconds. This online vlog is the fourth in a series of online vlogs describing what Pro-Tactile means within the DeafBlind community.  "Pro-Tactile" in this context means the value of touch for purposes of communication. During this brief conversation, Jelica and aj continue the conversation regarding back-channeling begun on a previous vlog in order to respond to questions they received about the practice.  This document is available on the web at: http://www.protactile.org/2016/03/pro-tactile-vlog-4.html

2012-0140

SENSING THE RHYTHMS OF EVERYDAY LIFE: Temporal Integration and Tactile Translation in the Seattle Deaf-Blind Community/ Edwards, Terra. 2012, 42. This article is concerned with how social actors establish relations between language, the body, and the physical and social environment. The empirical focus is a series of interactions between Deaf-Blind people and tactile signed language interpreters in Seattle, Washington. Many members of the Seattle Deaf-Blind community were born deaf and, due to a genetic condition, lose their vision slowly over the course of many years. Drawing on recent work in language and practice theory, the author argues that these relations are established by Deaf-Blind people through processes of INTEGRATION whereby continuity between linguistic, embodied, and social elements of a fading visual order are made continuous with corresponding elements in an emerging tactile order. In doing so, she contributes to current attempts in linguistic anthropology to model the means by which embodied, linguistic, and social phenomena crystallize in relational patterns to yield worlds that take on the appearance of concreteness and naturalness.  LANGUAGE IN SOCIETY, vol. 41, #1, 2012, pp. 29-71

2008-0573

UNDERSTANDING DIVERSITY IN THE DEAF COMMUNITY: Liz Halperin, Simon, Julie H. -- Region X Interpreter Education Center at Western Oregon University: 2001, 48 minutes. This video is intended for interpreters, students, educators, parents, and members of the deaf community. It is designed to provide viewers with a better understanding of multiculturalism and diversity within the American deaf community. In this video, Liz Halperin, who is deaf-blind, shares her experiences and perspectives. ASL with English voiceover.

2008-0574

UNDERSTANDING DIVERSITY IN THE DEAF COMMUNITY: Mark Landreneau, Simon, Julie H. -- Region X Interpreter Education Center at Western Oregon University: 2001, 39 minutes. This video is intended for interpreters, students, educators, parents, and members of the deaf community. It is designed to provide viewers with a better understanding of multiculturalism and diversity within the American deaf community. In this video, Mark Landreneau, who is deaf-blind due to Usher Syndrome, shares his experiences and perspectives. ASL with English voiceover.


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