Skip to main content
Default avatar image

Initiative Background and Data Facts


You are a group member!

Please login.

You must first login before joining this group.

Login or Make a Profile

Initiative Background and Data Facts

Literacy

This page was last updated on Jul 28, 2016 at 2:51 pm

101 views

Initiative Background
In 2006, NCDB’s Literacy Practice Partnership began dedicated work on technical assistance models and tools to enhance literacy instruction for children with combined hearing and vision loss. Their efforts produced a set of literacy indicators and a collection of resources that grew into a central repository for instruction and training materials. Those resources became the basis for the Literacy for Children with Combined Vision and Hearing Loss website. The site delivers strategies for teaching literacy and activities to expand learning opportunities for children with deaf- blindness, multiple disabilities, and complex challenges. Over time, a group of state deaf-blind projects and other partners have joined together to further develop the website and share resources used in the technical assistance they deliver in their states related to literacy.  



Where Literacy Instruction and Education Happens - Data Facts

Communication and social interaction go hand in hand with learning literacy and both begin at birth and develop through rich experiences with in the environment.  As children progress through the stages of communication and literacy development it is important that these experiences happen in the home and community as well as in pre-school and school.

Until age 3 almost all infants and toddlers receive intervention and educational services in the home. According to the 2015 Deaf-Blind Child Count, over 94% receive Part C services in the home.

This changes as children transition out of Part C services and into early childhood special education services (ages 3-5). Children begin to receive educational services in many settings and from many personnel once they enter the Part B system. Over 40% receive educational services in a regular early childhood setting some portion of the day/week. Another 38% receive their educational services in a separate classroom or school some portion of the day/week. Only about 4% continue to receive educational services in the home. This array of settings beyond the home expands greatly the numbers and roles of service providers needing information and tools to help them work with young children across the stages of development to promote communication and literacy development.

Once children reach school age they continue to receive educational services in many settings and from many different personnel once they enter the Part B system. Most (66%) will receive educational services in a regular early childhood setting some portion of the day/week. Another 20% receive their educational services in a separate school. About 5% receive educational services in a residential facility. The balance of 9% receive their services in the home, hospital or a parentally place private school. This array of settings again has significant implications for the numbers and roles of service providers needing information and tools to help them work with young children across the stages of development to promote communication and literacy development.

Regardless of age and setting for receiving services to promote communication and literacy development, service providers and parents will need knowledge and skills that cut across the stages of development. Looking at participation is state assessment programs as a proxy for stage of development, it is clear that such a range is real and persistent.  Of the children and youth who participated in state assessment programs in 2015, just under 5 percent took regular grade level assessments without any accommodations. About 19% took regular grade level assessments with accommodations. On the other end of the spectrum of state assessments, about 45% tool alternative assessment tied to alternative standards and about 12% percent took assessments tied to modified standards. This range of assessments was evident across all educational placements, though there were some patterns that did emerge, such as 50% of the children and youth taking regular grade level assessments (with or without accommodations) were in the regular education classroom at least 80% of the day. 


Please login.

You must first login before posting your comments here.

Login or Make a Profile

0 Comments

NCDB : The Research Institute : Western Oregon University : 345 N. Monmouth Ave. : Monmouth, OR 97361
Contact Us: 800-438-9376 | info@nationaldb.org

Tour This Page Website Help
Help for this page

Help Guides & Tutorials