Key Strategies for Improving Outcomes

Audiences: Families MDT SC DSP

This unit provides information on effective intervention strategies for working with infants and toddlers with multiple disabilities, including those with combined vision and hearing loss.

PowerPoint Slides

IN Training (Part 2): Slides 16-17
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These slides cover responsive environments and Active Learning principles.

PA Webinar: Slides 61-62
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These slides give an overview of Active Learning and link to a video example of a Little Room.

Videos

Eli in the Active Learning Space

A young boy plays in a Little Room (0:31).

Active Learning: Alyssa

This video from Washington Sensory Disabilities Services features a young girl in an Active Learning space (2:17). [Note: Click on the "Videos" tab—it's the first video on the page.]

Recorded Presentations

Active Learning: 5-Part Webinar Series

This series presents ideas for moving from assessment to IEP development to delivering instruction using an Active Learning approach (hosted by Penrickton Center for Blind Children, Perkins, and TSBVI).

Handouts

Active Learning Space

This website presents an overview of Active Learning.

PowerPoint Slides

IN Training (Part 2): Slides 32-53
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These slides cover the importance of using cues and symbols.

PA Webinar: Slides 34-37
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These slides give an overview of touch cues.

PowerPoint Slides

IN Training (Part 2): Slides 18-19
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These slides explain hand-under-hand technique.

PA Webinar: Slides 38-44
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These slides discuss hand-under-hand—what it is and how and why to use it.

Videos

Hand-Under-Hand: Kailee

This video from Washington Sensory Disabilities Services shows a provider using hand-under-hand with a young girl (2:20). [Note: Click on the "Videos" tab and scroll to the second-to-last video on the page.]

PowerPoint Slides

IN Training (Part 2): Slides 20-21
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These slides give an overview of wait time.

Videos

IN Training: Wait Time
IN Training: Wait Time Transcript

Barbara Purvis talks about how children with deaf-blindness need more time to process information (1:31).

Wait Time: Chris

A provider shakes a pom-pom in front of a young boy and waits for him to respond (0:47).

Handouts

Use of Sensory Channels

This one-page form from Washington Sensory Disabilities Services gathers information about which sensory avenues are being used by a child during typical activities.

Activity 1:
Complete the "Use of Sensory Channels" form for a student with whom you work. Based on the "observed behaviors" you listed on the form, think about what portion of the body might be the best to use to present novel information (e.g., feet, arm, leg, cheek, etc.).

Activity 2:
Select a goal related to wait time or choice making from the IFSP of a child you know and determine how the goal could be worked on throughout the day and in multiple settings.